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  5. "Conoscendo mio padre, sicura…

"Conoscendo mio padre, sicuramente mangiamo in quel ristorante stasera."

Translation:Knowing my father, we will certainly eat at that restaurant this evening.

January 5, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scontrino

why is mangiamo "will eat"- will eat is the future


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnrush

In Italian, the present tense can be used for immediate future meaning as long as some other element in the sentence makes a clear reference to the future; in the sentence above, 'stasera' qualifies. In another source, I've read that present is allowed when future plans are definite and not tentative. See http://italian.about.com/od/verbs/a/italian-verbs-present-tense.htm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlmoore28944

I think we eat in that restaurant tonight is actually a form a future tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith352848

But if there is a word for the future tense of mangiare, which there is, why in the world wouldn't they use it here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/runem

I think this is one of the few cases where duolingo accepts a proper english translation instead of just a literal one :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marifka

Question for native english speakers : can I say "we will surely eat..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariaelena256

yes, you can surely say that!! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marifka

Thank you :) So that's just duolingo...:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lindaljc

I thought the present tense could be used for events in the immediate future?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce55312

"We eat" seems perfectly OK in English. "Tonight we eat at the restaurant." DL should not reject the literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jum921982

The shiny new Dec 2018 UI has two nasty deficiencies on my phone: 1. The two line text input box is too small for long sentences, and 2. When you make an error, the correct text is displayed on top of your text and so you cannot see what you did wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeenanLapi

whiy 'mio' padre and not 'mi' padre ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elen-ka

I translated "scuramente" as "for sure" and it was market incorrect... could someone please explain, why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlsefni

mmm I don't see any reason why this is wrong. Unless you put it in a wrong place?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IkarusAlwaysWins

probably the software which cannot "think". so every correct answer likely has to be entered. There are many situations where i am banging my head ;).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elen-ka

why does " we will eat" option not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlsefni

If you are making a future prediction based on evidence in the present situation, use 'going to'.

I think this could be the reason why. source: http://www.englishgrammarsecrets.com/goingtoorwill/menu.php


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnrush

Hmmm. Native American English speaker here. 'We will eat...' is fine and is now accepted by DL. 'We are going to eat...' is also fine, especially in conversation, but is kind of (sloppy) casual talking. Anytime that you want to say 'We are going to...' you could just as well say 'We will...' They are completely interchangeable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlsefni

oh are they? It's time for me to update my grammar :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scjs

This is not true! "We will eat" and "we are going to eat" are NOT always interchangeable. Here are two links that discuss some of the differences:

http://esl.fis.edu/grammar/rules/future.htm http://www.grammar.cl/Notes/Future_Will_vs_Going.htm

For native English speakers: imagine someone saying "Hey, I'm going to buy you a drink?" versus "Hey, I'll buy you a drink?"

The first one is impossible, except in a special case where the speaker has been instructed to buy a drink for the listener, and is informing the listener (perhaps with resignation) that they are to buy a drink for the listener, whether they like it or not ("So...I guess I'm buying you a drink?"). The second one is grammatical, and it's a generous offer that could be turned down with no difficulty.

If you want a lot more detail, English doesn't have a real future tense like many other languages. But we (including us native speakers) are often taught in school that "will" and "going to" comprise the future tense. Instead of a future tense, we have a variety of modals that can be used to express predictions, intentions, etc., which can take place in the future. Here are two blog posts that go into more detail (one of which was written by the author of the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language).

http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/005471.html http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=897

Hope this helps!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlsefni

thank you! all the links you gave me were definitely helpful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkDeVernon

"Knowing my father, we shall surely eat in that restaurant this evening" is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InesCooper1

microphone was off


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizabeth156164

I believe my answer is correct

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