https://www.duolingo.com/David106

Roofs vs ceiling

Mi casas no tienen techo translated as my houses have no roof. 1) i thought techo was ceiling and tejado was roof. How do you specify a room with no ceiling, but a roof? 2) how do you specify a room with a ceiling but no roof only using techo?..3) since it is mis casas, shouldn't techo be techos (plural) ?

6 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
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Techo in Spanish can mean both "roof" and "ceiling."

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
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Wait until you guys find out the word for fingers and toes is the same.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Ha. When I get to that bit I'll probably give DL the toe!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pipersecretp3

Dedos (fingers) VERSUS dedos de pie (toes).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
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Spanish does not differentiate between fingers and toes. To disambiguate, you may use dedo de pie or dedo de mano.

"Los dedos son las extremidades de la mano y del pie del ser humano y de otros animales como los simios grandes ." https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dedo

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
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See, what you did pipersecretp3 is like this:

Yo: <<In English the word for 'nail' is the same for both hands and feet>>.

Usd: <<Nails (fingers) VERSUS toenails (toes).

I refer you to this link, you may find it an excellent guide to avoiding such situations in future:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Acarlosbunnell
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Jindr004, I think it's possible Pipersecretp3 was referring to the fact that fingers are much more commonly remarked upon (while toes are usually covered) and it ends up being a marked/unmarked situation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Markedness) rather than some 'metacognitive inability of the unskilled to recognize their ineptitude' just sayin...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pipersecretp3

Thank you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jujulita

'Ceiling'' can also be translated as ''cielo raso''. It is certainly used in Argentina -where I live- and I'm pretty sure in other South American countries too.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleJohn
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Questions 1 & 2 haven't been answered yet. can any native Spanish speakers explain how you distinguish between ceiling and roof? How would you translate the sentence "The ceiling has collapsed" in a way that it would be understood you mean the ceiling and not the roof?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CalvoViejo

For native English speakers it may seem an oddity, but since each house only has one roof, it's techo.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
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Not a native Spanish speaker and I have not researched the word "techo" but looking at it logically through out most human building history a roof and a ceiling were the same assembly. Even modern steel frame industrial buildings are that way and certainly a lot of traditional building techniques and poor housing in the world have just one layer as the roof/ceiling. I would use "fuera" (outside) or "dentro" (inside) in combination with "techo" to make it clear to a Spanish speaker what I was talking about. But still technically "techo dentro" is not describing what people call a ceiling. A Spanish speaker in the construction industry might know a better term.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IngridMorstrad

It's like how you would say (in English)

There's a roof on every house

instead of

There are roofs on every house

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Roofers in North America will tell you a house can have 2 or more roofs. Typically asphalt shingles can be laid over the top of the previous shingles. Not the best way to do it, but often done. Having been a contractor at one time, I have the same questions about ceiling and roof as others have posed. They are definitely different structures in most modern buildings, except flat-roof commercial/ industrial.

DL is going to start me reading construction journals in Spanish, I can see it coming :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
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In Peru one word for roof and ceiling: el techo

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrancoisBe275146

"techo" is roof or ceiling. "Tejado" is only roof but can only be used for roofs made out of "Teja" (roof tiles) !

1 year ago

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