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"Zonder haar gaat hij niet eten in de keuken."

Translation:Without her he does not go eat in the kitchen.

2 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/poperry44

I would never say ''go eat'', under any circumstances

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbrown19203

US english, irritating.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbrown19203

Why are we only given the option of saying that the Dutch sentence is incorrect or unnatural? Why is there not the same option for the English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillofKempsey
BillofKempsey
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Reported 11 April 17

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesGreening

I gave them the translation they wanted, but it is very poor English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbrown19203

Yes but it is better in American

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill_A
Bill_A
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I said "without her, he does not eat in the kitchen" and was marked as incorrect - there is nothing wrong with what I said. In the UK we don't say "go eat" - is this American English?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbrown19203

Yes it is American English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauraBorge4

Is "without her he does not go to eat in the kitchen", not correct ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pixor
Pixor
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I would have imagined that it's correct... It doesn't sound correct to say "does no go eat". Surely it should be "does not go to eat"...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LauraBorge4

Yes i agree. I wouldn't say it in a conversation...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/89MBD
89MBD
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If gaan + infinitive is a way to express future tense in Dutch, shouldn't this be accepted? WIthout her, he will/shall not eat in the kitchen

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RedCurlyGirl

Well... I understood from the comments below that the correct answer is American English. But, hey, why not to accept also British English, which is actually not that simplified as American and refers to the rules?

10 months ago