"Chdi eisiau bwyta rŵan?"

Translation:Do you want to eat now?

March 20, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

How come it's not 'chdi isio bwyta rw^an?' ? Isn't this sentence a weird blend of the North and South dialects?

March 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

The dialects are not exact lines and there are some areas where you will find 'hybrid' sentences.

March 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

ahh ok, thanks

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/riddlemethishan

To be honest while Welsh isn't my first language (because we're close to the border) in school we seemed to have learned the south dialect. So despite the fact I live in the North I've always used eisiau and I've actually never heard isio until now. Same with all the other words here.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

It always confuses me, because I thought that most Welsh speakers live in the North, and so speak the North dialect. So why is government documents/administrative stuff/books/this Duo course etc. all in South Welsh if most Welsh speakers are in the North.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

In the 2011 census, the areas with the highest numbers (not %) of Welsh speakers were, in order: Carmarthenshire, Gwynedd, Anglesey, Cardiff, Ceredigion, Conwy, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Swansea. So, a mix of areas, really, and spread out across the 4-6 (not 2!) main dialects.

Official documents, etc are not written in a particular dialect.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

and yeah you're right, I was definetely getting % and numbers mixed up, I didn't take into account that more people live in the South.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

Ahh ok, thanks for the facts. I'm just going off what my Welsh friend says, she always complains that it's hard for her to read books in Welsh becuase they are always written in a Southern dialect.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Definitely not true!

Novels that I have read recently have used a mix of all sorts of dialects: Kate Roberts' famous short stories use spoken dialect from the quarry area between Caernarfon and Porthmadog, Alun Jones' novels ('Ac yna Clywodd Sŵn y Môr' is a GCSE set book) have a lot of Llŷn dialect in them, Bethan Gwanas uses a lot of NW Wales dialect in her books, 'Veritas' by Mari Lisa uses a lot of mid-Wales dialect in the quoted speech portions and characters from elsewhere seem to use their own local dialect, T Rowland Hughes used a lot of north Wales quarry district dialect (in 'O Law i Law', for example), 'Y Llyfrgell' by Fflur Dafydd is set in Aberystwyth, ....

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

Cool thanks, when I get better at Welsh I might give Alun Jones' books a go then, because Llŷn peninsula is always the area I visit.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/riddlemethishan

Mainly because the Welsh Assembly is in Cardiff and the south just like to pretend that the north doesn't exist... But you know that's probably just me being biased.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ieuan-Jones

I'm doing Welsh for Adults in Cardiff right now, and there's been plenty of times where they've pointed out words that are more common elsewhere in the country, or how they'd say it in the north if it's particularly different.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

isio/isia/isie are common pronunciations in various parts of Wales of the word eisiau - you will not find them in many dictionaries, for example. However, many people will sometimes write the word as isio/isie/isia when writing informally.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/samstyan99

ahh ok so it's more of a spoken distinction than a written one

March 21, 2016
Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.