https://www.duolingo.com/LupoMikti

Double Imperative?

LupoMikti
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Hopefully this is a quick question with a relatively easy answer :-)

I just finished the imperative skill of the tree and understand the part of the tips that says you cannot have two imperatives follow each other, with their example using 'Bonvolu'.

However, I was thinking on this a little more and now would like to know how to say "Please let me …" or "Please let us …" since the "let me/us" part is formed as an imperative as well. Is there another verb introduced for "let" that is used in this situation, like "to allow" perhaps?

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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One imperative. The rest would be infinitive.

Bonvolu permesi al mi helpi vin vidi ....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LupoMikti
LupoMikti
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Dankon! So it is as I suspected? That another verb would be used instead of a second imperative? Also, why "al mi" instead of "min" after permisi?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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There are three "agents" (if you will) to "permesi" - the person who is giving permission, the person who is receiving the permission, and the thing being permitted. The person giving the permission is the subject. The thing being permitted can be thought of as the object. And the permission is going TO someone -- and this is generally thought of as the indirect object.

You might be able to get away with "min" but "al mi" is the common way.

Note: if the "thing being permitted" is expressed as a verb (and it usually is) it does not need an accusative ending, since those are for nouns and adjective.

Hope that helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LupoMikti
LupoMikti
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It helps a lot. Sometimes I forget to think of some verbs as "giving" something and it definitely helps to think of "to permit" as "to give permission to". Danke sehr!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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It's sometimes hard to tell how much detail is helpful and how much is confusing -- and it depends on the person. I suppose I should have looked at your flags to figure out you probably already know about indirect objects.

After I clicked "post" yesterday I had the thought that really there are a whole class of verbs which involve an actor causing one thing to pass to another thing (doni, sendi, diri, permesi, k.m.a.) and they all tend to take the subject, verb, indirect object, direct object pattern -- although it's not necessarily a hard and fast rule.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClaesJohannson

Yes there is! It is called Ditransitive verb: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ditransitive_verb

Thankfully Esperanto make things simple by turning all the noun phrases of indirect objects into prepositional phrases.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Please let's go - Bonvole iru ni

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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That sounds really bizarre to me.

"Please let's go" -- I think the "please" is addressed to the listener(s), not to "us" (including the speaker), but in your sentence, it modifies "ni iru".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I was thinking the same thing. It doesn't sound right to me in English or Esperanto. I wondered if it was a regional idiom or a song lyric. "Bonvole" is already a little bit unconventional (only a little bit). Maybe "Mi petas, ni iru" or "Ni iru, mi petas" - let's go, please.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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The English sounds fine to me, FWIW; it's just the Esperanto that looked odd to me.

"Lass uns jetzt bitte gehen" works in German as well.

Perhaps because those use an explicit second-person imperative ("let!", "lass!") to paraphrase a first-person-plural imperative, and that second-person imperative which can be modified by a "second-person" "please" more readily than the real first-person-plural imperative that Esperanto has.

If it had been "Bonvolu lasi/bonvole lasu nin iri", that would have been easier, I think, but that is more like "permit us to go" than a suggestion.

2 years ago
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