"A tartaruga dorme embaixo do travesseiro."

Translation:The turtle sleeps under the pillow.

January 6, 2014

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

If anyone cares, there's also "terrapin," which I understand is the word for a turtle or tortoise you intend to cook and serve. But it may have a zoological definition as well.

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessamator

Thanks, you've taught me something too, I had never heard of that species of turtles. According to Google translate, it seems to be :

  • 'tartaruga de água doce' = terrapin.
January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cajueiro012

I would never know if you haven't said, haha That's the beauty in language, always something new to say

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomaRRio

Why I must use do in this sentence?

February 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olsztynr

I have the same question - why isn't it sufficient to say "a tartaruga dorme embaixo o travesseiro"?

February 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyopm

"a tartaruga dorme embaixo o travesseiro" is a sentence that does not make sense in portuguese because there's no connection between the turtle action with the pillow. i see the confusion because "the" also means "o", but in this case people have to use "do" to make a reference to the pillow. i'm a native portuguese speaker but this is very hard to explain, haha. sorry.

August 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RomaRRio

i mean using do or de

February 24, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

Because "under" in Portuguese is "embaixo de", not just "embaixo". Learning prepositions is the most difficult to master when learning a foreign language. At times a preposition is used in Portuguese when it's not used in English and vice versa. And even when a preposition is used in both languages, it's not that easy to learn which preposition to use.

"The pillow" is "O travesseiro"

So "under the pillow" is "embaixo de o travesseiro". But "de+o = do", so then it becomes "embaixo do travesseiro".

Now, I'm no expert in Portuguese, so my explanation might have some errors, but I hope that helps.

September 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yibemajam

Thanks Thankwee, I think your explanation makes sense to me. Have a lingot.

October 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllPeach

I wrote below instead of under. It was counted wrong.

March 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciana.ri18

in portuguese: under=embaixo, below=abaixo ;)

March 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

Thank you. So both languages make a similar distinction.

March 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DingoELGringo

I put beneath and that was found acceptable!

October 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

Well, it's possible, but below would just mean that the turtle is on a lower level than the pillow, whereas this sentence probably means that the turtle is covered by the pillow. We would use under for that, when something is covered by something else on top of it. If the pillow is on the bed and the turtle is on the floor next to the bed, you could say it was below the pillow. But you probably wouldn't be motivated to make that observation.

March 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

Is there a different word for tortoise in Portuguese? That was marked wrong. I think in English a turtle is technically a marine or aquatic animal, so would not be likely to sleep under a pillow. The land reptile is a tortoise.

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessamator

Well you can also call it a "cágado".

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamShea1

Be careful with your intonation when using this one ;)

June 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrisBoc

We have tartaruga, jabuti and cágado (pay attention to the accent or you might end up saying something you really don't mean to hahahaha). Jabuti is the exclusively land reptile, while the cágado can also live on water (altough only in rivers, I think). But informally, people use to refer to all of them as "tartaruga".

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessamator

Shame, you should tell him/her what it means :) . Cagado literally means, defecated (pooped on oneself), it is also a slang term that may mean someone who doesn't care about something, or someone who is afraid.

On-topic, Crisboc's definitions are all accurate (as far as I know), the only one I rarely if ever hear is the jabuti. I don't think it is very common, so novices are better off sticking to either tartaruga or cágado.

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrisBoc

Fair enough, good explanation =)

To me jabuti is more common than cágado, I don't know if this is a regional thing or not...

And if anyone wants to practice a bit of spoken Portuguese, take a look in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f604jg6BDAk

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cajueiro012

well done, guess you're a dilligent student, right?

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessamator

Portuguese is my native language, and I'm already an intermediary in English. I just pass through here to learn a bit and help others.

Anyway, for future readers : I believe they should know that tartaruga is a gender neutral term. It doesn't necessarily refer to the female of the species.

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

thank you. You should know we really appreciate you native speakers who "pass through" and explain so much.

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cajueiro012

I see, sounds great, good luck dude

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luciana.ri18

notice the difference between "caGAdo" and "CÁgado"

February 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mgaristova

Pray, what is the difference between "embaixo de" and "sob"?

June 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tyopm

none - nenhuma :)

August 25, 2015
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