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  5. "Freuen Sie sich."

"Freuen Sie sich."

Translation:Be happy.

January 7, 2014

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dule1ja

Don't worry. Be happy. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gennuisance

I'm worried, need money


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanilegoPlays

Kein Sorgen. Freuen Sie sich :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bMVr

What about Enjoy yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

that would be more like "viel Spaß!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

My Berlin landlady would say to me ""Viel Vergnugung" ( sorry if I've misspelled; I've only heard this word ) when I'd go out at night. Wouldn't that be akin to "viel Spass"? In any case wouldn't "Freuen Sie sich" convey the meaning of wishing someone a good time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

it's "viel Vergnügen!", and yes, that's pretty much the same as "viel Spaß!": (have) a lot of fun/ (have) a lot of pleasures!

But "Freuen Sie sich!" would not be used to wish someone a good time. It's more like "be glad (about whatever happened)!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raisinnoir

Thanks for the clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meligordman

Would "Cheer up" be a bad translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

I think you would use "cheer up" only when the person is sad at the moment. You would not use it if you called the winner of the lottery, because you have no reason to suspect they had a bad mood before you called.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashtwe

Why can't it be translated as "They are happy"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

A capitalized "Sie" means "you". But even if you don't count that, the word order would mean it's actually a question, so it's "are they happy?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aileigc

It doesn't have a ? at the end, but I see the verb is in the first position. Could it be because it is an imperative form, and not a question? Don't imperatives put the verb in the first place, instead of the second?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakasiru

You are right, the original sentence is a form of imperative. But since duolingo does not count punctuation marks, they probably accept it as a question, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kris6284

'Make yourself happy' didnt work for me ;( ich bin nicht freuen ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonanSill

What about: Enjoy! refused by Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
  • 1607

Likewise (reported).
"Enjoy!" is different from "Enjoy yourself", and I see no functional difference between "Enjoy!" (when not used as a response to "Thank you") and "Be happy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

You don't see a functional difference between "Enjoy!" and "Be happy."? You're presumably happy or at least happier while you're enjoying something, but that doesn't mean they're not functionally different. "Enjoy" pertains to how you relate to a particular thing or activity. Being happy has to do with your mood and state of mind in general. It's not about any particular activity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinCard

This is really unnatural sounding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcmahler

I'm imagining a radio station giving out a prize and telling the person to get excited/be happy for winning. Except they'd probably use 'du' on the Radio nowadays.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcticbee

why is it reflexive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

It is what it is. It is a reflexive verb so it needs the reflexive pronoun. I suppose that is because it is about making yourself happy, not someone else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Kierz_

why not she is happy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheMadLinguist

The conjugation and the fact that 'Sie' is capitalized means that it's the formal 'you' form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

Well, mine was an oral exercise, so you do not see the words... In which case, how do you know which sie/Sie is referred to?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoniH80

In this case Sie is the only logical answer - it's imperative, you wouldn't use imperative for a third person


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoniH80

How would you say this with du?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamSmi311052

I feel "Enjoy yourself." should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

I, too, thought the literal translation "Enjoy yourself" should be accepted, but apparently that just doesn't fit with what it actually conveys in the German language and culture. Every culture is different, and literal translations can be wrong. "Viel Spaß!" is closer to "Enjoy yourself," although I think the usual translation is "Have fun!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tlear0412

I wrote "Please yourself" as a literal translation, why would this be wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlesErbanSAP

how about 'look forward'? Like I am throwing a party tonight. Look forward! (I know in english it is somewhat cumbersome, but in german that could make sense. In Czech it does..)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/khdavoodi

Google Translate translates it as "look forward". Is that correct? It also provides "Sei glüglich" for "be happy". Is that acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doctor-John

To be more precise, Google currently translates "Freuen Sie scih." as "You can look forward to it." That's disappointing. Google is not usually that far off. As you know, Google Translate is a useful tool, but not an authority. Fortunately, Google got "Sei glücklcih" right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seawaves12

I wonder if you edit the translation the new translation will stick, provided more people do the same editing as you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pouriya0

Shouldn't sich start with capital S, like Sie?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Smilecarri

Why use two sie here?

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