"Masz dwanaście złotych?"

Translation:Do you have twelve złoty?

March 24, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/HelbentForleder

But why not 12 zlotys (with an 's')?

June 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Definitely should be accepted. And it is, so I hear.

June 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

why is it zloty in the English translation and not złoty?

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

Because there is no ł in English orthography – Polish złoty is refereed to as either "Zloty" or by its international abbreviation PLN in English.

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

there are no accents in English but most of the foreign names that have accents do keep them https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_z%C5%82oty (ł is used instead of l)

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

The article you linked was started on 9 July 2002 by IP contributor that comes from Poland(the IP is used by biggest Polish ISP), that might be the reason. ;-)

Google Ngram shows that "złoty" almost doesn't exist, compared to "zloty".

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

well that's probably because most people can't type the ł, which doesn't make "zloty" correct

if you look at other wikipedia articles that have Polish names in them (or any other language with accents), the accents are kept in most of the cases (except when an English name exists, like Warsaw instead of Warszawa, and Silesia instead of Śląsk)

March 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KirillKozlovsky

Personal names are something that rarely changes from language to language unless the alphabets are different. They often appear in documents, after all, so uniformity is expected. Same with toponyms. Currencies, though - not so much. Their names may change in accordance with the language, and in official documents they can be referred to by acronyms like USD, EUR or RUR, to avoid any confusion.

July 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

that's true but złoty does not change

July 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Skulkin

In the UK at least loanwords do often keep their accent but are commonly written without, unless the person wants to appear slightly fancy. eg. on signs or a menu you will often see café while almost everyone in common conversation would use cafe.

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bluthbanana87

It's not wrong to use 'złoty', but many people will have difficulties pronouncing it, and if they don't have a keyboard with the 'ł' glyoh installed, they'll have trouble typing it.

Similarly, the country of Curaçao is spelled with the 'ç' or with a 'c'.

November 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

I always use zloty in English even though I always leave my settings on my keyboard as Polish. Strangely, Wikipedia writes it as "złoty" on the English page.

October 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

because it's the way it should be...

October 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Why? I think both are accepted

October 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

accepted because most people can't type the ł on their keyboards

October 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Fabfifties

I've been studying polish for months, and only now am I learning what a złoty is...

March 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ADJD4

Since I learned the Polish word, I always say and write złotych (or złoty etc. obviously where appropriate), even when the rest of the sentence is in English. It's the Polish name for a Polish thing that we don't have in amy English-speaking area, so why should we anglicise the name for it or have our own name for it? I mean, yeah ok, maybe accept it without the stroke through the l and undeclined in an English sentence if some people don't have the diacritics on their keyboard or feel weird declining nouns when writing in English, but if I write złotych there's no way that's wrong, is it?

May 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

That's a good question. As 'ł' in the default English sentence is concerned, I guess maybe there's no need to wait for the new course to change it - I changed it at least in those three sentences in this section.

As for "złotych" in the English version... on one hand, Wikipedia states that "The recognized English form of the word is zloty, plural zloty or zlotys." On the other, it uses the "złotych" form 48 times anyway. So... I guess it should be accepted. Added now.

May 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ADJD4

Haha, Wikipedia. Thanks for accepting

May 25, 2017
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