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"Det plejede ikke at være sådan."

Translation:Usually it was not like that.

March 28, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaKropp

So literally translated this would read: "It used to not be so?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Lisa, yes, that would be the case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scalambra

What's this obsession Duolingo has with translating the verb at pleje with the adverb usually?! Here one can say: It didn't use to be like that / this, which is more literal, and very natural English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

It didn't use to be so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GigiGottwald

Why not also "... like this"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Sure, that's good as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilaalil

why is it in the past?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

'Plejede' is the past form, and usually translated as 'used to'. A negation of that makes the English sentence a bit awkward, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duodb

It didn't use to feel awkward to me. :-) Seriously, in speech, I find "I didn't use to" perfectly natural, but in writing it does seem awkward.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Hmm, let me shape a theory here. :)
It probably does sound less awkward in speech because while speaking you do not make a difference between "use to" and "used to", so it sounds familiar. But while writing, you are bound to use "use to", and this phrase does not make much sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duodb

Yes, I agree. In fact in "used to" the s is unvoiced -- like the noun use, but unlike the verb use or used in other contexts. In "used to" it's hard to distinguish the unvoiced s from a voiced s, and both sound okay. But in "didn't use to" the unvoiced s sticks out, and in writing the... unusual... noun/verb conflation is hard to ignore.

Edit: Well hmm I agreed, and then went on to make a distinction between some pronunciations of "use to" and "used to." So let me clarify that normally the s is unvoiced in both of them, and they do sound very similar; but you can voice the s in "used to" without it being too jarring, whereas you cannot in "use to." Or at least I can't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/terry415

I never heard anyone pronounce "used to" or "use to" without voicing the 's.' I probably wouldn't even understand it pronounced that way! I'm curious what dialect that is...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Well, that may be the case, I really don't know. I'm not a native English speaker and voice the s in all of these cases. :)
But in doubt let's just say that spoken language is generally much looser than written language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duodb

My dialect is Midwestern US, and I've spent a lot of time in the East and West of the country as well. I don't think I've heard any native speaker voice the s, except when speaking slowly and with emphasis -- but it's quite possible that I just haven't been paying enough attention.

Here are a couple on Forvo, which both sound unvoiced to me (one from Australia):

https://forvo.com/phrase/i_used_to_get_teased_about_my_name./

https://forvo.com/phrase/the_bigger_girls_used_to_chase_me_and_tickle_me./

Now I'm curious: in what dialect(s) do you hear the s voiced? How would you pronounce "I'm not used to drinking orange juice, though I used to drink it a lot"? Me: yoosta, ornch, yoostoo. I know that not everyone pronounces "orange juice" this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angus895979

It sounds more like plejer than plejede

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