"Ich bin Hans."

Translation:I am Hans.

March 31, 2016

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markus497151

Get the flammenwerfer!

March 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pentzilam

Ya!

July 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerranExpression

In German, isn't the heißen construction used for introductions?

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It often is, but it’s not mandatory; you could also say Mein Name ist Hans or Ich bin (der) Hans (*) as well as Ich heiße Hans.

(*) The version with included der is quite a bit more colloquial.

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandizzi

To say something "I am the Hans" in some languages would imply Hans is known, but not in person. One would say "I am the Hans from accounting, we've not met before but you'read my reports." Is this implication necessary in German, too?

April 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That would be how you would use it formal language, yes, as in English.

But in informal language, especially in certain regions, the article is used with people's names even without such an implication.

I should probably not have mentioned it, but having said it, it's probably best to prepare to recognise that usage from native speakers ("Ich bin der Hans. Kennst du die Hannah? Weißt du, ob der Paul mitkommt? Ich muss das noch der Steffi sagen.") but not use it yourself until you're fluent enough to pick it up naturally and recognise when it's appropriate to use it. It is pretty informal, at least in my experience.

April 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2babyturtles

When introducing yourself in German with (for example) an American name, is it best to pronounce it the way you would in American English or the way a native German likely would?

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eight81

It would be best to pronounce it the way you pronounce it. Although, some people, such as me, get obsessed with the language they are learning. My name is really spelled 'Nolah Leick' but I have gotten so obsessed with German I now spell it 'Nölah Leich'. It is really a matter of whatever you feel comfortable with.

February 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liannshannon

I think it would be an awesome desktop feature if we could just toggle the options via the keyboard by typing the first letter of the next word or by using the arrow keys. It would be so much faster!

November 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Murat941

How come "Ich heisse Hans" is not accepted?

May 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SidneyVanhoose

Is it ok to change the ch in Ich to a sh sound when in a sentence?

July 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is it ok to change the ch in Ich to a sh sound when in a sentence?

No. Kirche "church" and Kirsche "cherry" are two completely different words, for example.

Some people in Germany do speak like that (turning the Ich-Laut into a "sh" sound), but it's a regional accent and is not standard pronunciation.

July 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrynaLearnStuff

The translation means "I am Hans", but in the notes, where there is "no continuous aspect"-- does that rule apply only to verbs?

Ex: In German, there's no continuous aspect, i.e. there are no separate forms for "I drink," and "I am drinking,." There is only one form: "Ich trinke." ("Ich bin trinke" and "Ich bin trinken" don't exist)

When is the irregular verb "Sein" (to be) supposed to be used, then?

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

sein is used, among other things,

  • to say that one thing is the same thing as something else (Ich bin Hans = I am Hans)
  • to describe the role that someone has (Mein Vater ist Arzt = My father is a doctor)
  • to describe an object as being part of a larger group (Katzen sind Tiere = Cats are animals)
  • to describe an object with an adjective (Wir sind müde = we are tired)

It's also used as an auxiliary verb (helping verb) to form the present perfect and pluperfect of some verbs (Er ist schon nach Hause gegangen = He has gone home already; literally: He is already to home gone).

November 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CJ.Dennis

In English, the continuous aspect is formed by "to be [verb]ing", where you conjugate the verb "to be". "I am Hans" is not in the continuous aspect. That would be "I am being Hans", which I'm sure sounds strange to you.

In the sentence "I am Hans", the verb "to be" is a copula, it links the two pieces together (couples them) to say that they're the same thing: "I and Hans are the same person".

December 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben936193

Let me just say how much people love Frozen those Disney morons decided to make Frozen 2 like do they even know how much I hate Frozen and the song "Let it go" I thought Elsa would let her life go as if she would DIE IN A FIRE.

March 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

It won't accept "I am John."

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Names are not usually translated in English or German.

Franz Beckenbauer is not "Francis/Frank Basinbuilder" in English, nor is Henry Longfellow "Heinrich/Heinz Langbursch" in German.

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

I know it's unusual. It's an out of fashion tradition that's treated as archaic of late. But it's a fair move! I should get extra credit. Let's not forget Georg III!

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SumanDutta13

What is the difference between Ich heiza and Ich bin?

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo
  • ich heiße = I am called / my name is
  • ich bin = I am
November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna694674

Different words (see mizinamo's answer), but both can (almost) equally be used to introduce yourself.

April 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RVIu8i

Hans isn't John in English?

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

No, it's Hans. "Hans" and "John" may be etymologically related, but if a German named Hans came to your country, you would not call him John.

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

I would. Just the same as if I were in It'ly, they'd call me Giacomo. Guess there's two schools of thought on that.

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

Um, you can't just call someone something other than their actual name (unless they've specifically told you to call them that). "John" doesn't sound like "Hans," so Hans will have no idea why you're calling him that, or maybe no idea who you're even talking to.

I highly doubt most people in Italy would call you something other than your English name (or a slight modification, if they can't pronounce it) unless you've specifically told them to. Most people aren't aware of etymological name equivalents anyway, so I doubt many would even think of "Giacomo" in the first place.

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

perhaps you haven't been to it'ly. they've quite found of dropping the "h" off my name. let me explain to you how it will happen, ala max von sydow in three days of the condor, sooner or later your friend'll think he's funny and think he has the liberty to call me jimbo. that's when i strike......BAMB! with the johnny!! don't like being called johnny, where do you get off calling me jimbo?! if you don't know your name variations don't come crying to me when hans starts bullying you!

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiperSprin

It say Ich bin ei- Hans

August 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdityaJain788508

what does hans mean? Please Help

August 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

what does hans mean?

There is no word "hans".

Duo's sentence uses "Hans" (capitalised), which is a name.

It's short for "Johannes", a German form of the Hebrew name that became "John" in English.

August 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimplySimar

What is the difference between ' Ich' and "heiBe'

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

ich = I

heißen is a verb meaning something like "to have the name ...; to be called ...", so ich heiße Hans could be translated as "my name is Hans; I am called Hans; I have the name Hans". The ich means "I" and the heiße is the verb form that matches it, the "am called" or "have the name" part.

July 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TuxedoCreeper595

The hay kind of name is hans

June 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Short form of Johannes and thus equivalent to the English name John, both going back to Hebrew Yokhanan via Greek Iôannês and/or Latin Ioannes, Iohannes.

June 17, 2016
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