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"Я собираюсь продолжить этот рассказ."

Translation:I am going to continue this story.

2 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
BillEverett
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То есть, продолжение следует.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Продолжение следует = To be continued?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
BillEverett
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Yes. But not literally. Literally, "continuation follows." But it is used like the English phrase. "Когда заканчиваешь смотреть любимый сериал онлайн, всегда ждешь заветной надписи «Продолжение следует», даже если известно, что оно не запланировано." http://www.ivi.ru/watch/prodolzhenie_sleduet

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126
Theron126
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Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
OinophilosPlus
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Would "narration" or "narrative" be accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Willwsharp

'I am planning on continuing this story' is not accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RickBowers
RickBowers
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If "I am going to continue this story" is acceptable, why not 'I will continue this story."?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kundoo
Kundoo
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"Собираюсь" means "I am going to" in a sense of "I am planing to", but it doesn't mean "I will". Planning to do something is not the same as to actually do it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThaCF23
ThaCF23
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As my English teacher said the sentence with "I will" says that you had had an idea of doing it just before you said that and that it is not really planned. While I am going to" means that you have planned it at least for some time and you prepare for it. Also if we speak about future "I am continuing the story" (or to avoid strange words "I am writing the story") means that either it is done on strict schedule or that you decided to do it no matter what. (!) ^Please correct me if I am wrong (!) So having said that the closest translations for those cases would be 1. I am going to... - Я собираюсь.. (kinda I am preparing in literal translation) 2. Я продолжу - I will continue 3. Я продолжаю - I am continuing

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeoG94
LeoG94
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Собираюсь писать или читать?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lagolas2010

Probably, "I am going to continue telling you this story."

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peter594672
Peter594672
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It's a "good for all" solution, as it can be anything. Whatever it was according to your context.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewBolg1

As a native English speaker I consider "I shall do x" to mean "I intend to do x", with the conditional sense of "shall" conveying the idea that of course events may intervene to prevent me.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
OinophilosPlus
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It can also be a simple prediction: if you do not come to my party, I shall be very disappointed. I would use “shall” only with the first person with this meaning, probably because there is some intention involved, as you say. When shall is used with the second or third person it has the sense of obligation or promise. It occurs in rules and legal prescriptions: Thou shalt not . . . Or “If the judge so rules, the prisoner shall be released.” Will would be simple prediction but shall states an order.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
OinophilosPlus
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Future expressions on English are very complex and depend heavily on context. It’s hard to make a rule that covers all incidences. For example, one difference between « Will » and « going to » is that will/shall is more formal. Whether you ask “Will you be here tomorrow?” or “Are you going to be here tomorrow?” is a matter of style, probably depending on who is being addressed and whether you are speaking or writing.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
OinophilosPlus
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Another difference between will and going to is that will is a less immediate future: it will rain vs it’s going to rain. The former indicates a vaguer time frame. Also will is used more comfortably with abstract conditionals: “If you press too hard, the handle will break” vs an immediate real possibility “If you keep pressing like that, the handle’s going to break.” Getting far afield here, but future expressions are my favorite English grammar subject.

5 days ago