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"Ellos van a poner su mano aquí."

Translation:They are going to put their hand here.

-1
5 years ago

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/curtisnelson

I think Su mano" has to be "sus manos" to be consistently plural with "ellos."

17
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
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I believe when a group does the same thing in spanish you can use a singular direct object, for example if you say "ellos comen una manzana" it can be understood as they each eat an apple not they all share one apple.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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I don't think so. Just imagine those people putting a hand one at a time.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/downhand
downhand
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this is like they have a shared hand. i guess it has another meaning, maybe 'giving a hand' or 'helping out'.

14
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wolferine
wolferine
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Could "su mano" also be "his hand"? They cut of some man's hand and put his hand here?

30
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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Like relics in a church?

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnie.sjoberg

HA! :)

-1
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glenn.ashley
glenn.ashley
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They don't have to go and cut the poor guy's hand off just to place it here....

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

Yes, "They are going to put his hand here" is accepted.

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanProbando

¡Sí!

-2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

Ok, whose hand did they pick to "put here" Are they sharing the same hand?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pryan2870

Their hand could be a title. Like the "Hand of the Iron Throne"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rayhunter
Rayhunter
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Well, this one could be translated as 'They are going to put his hand here' , which I've written.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

Hi. Didn't we have something similar to this with "talking behind their backs"? In English, we pluralize the word "back", but in Spanish it is used in a singular form "su espalda". So I'm thinking this is the same situation here. English would pluralize "their hands", but Spanish would say "his hand". So I think it has something to do with different rules of grammar for each language.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

In Spain we use the idiom "actuar a sus espaldas":

"¿Estabas conspirando a mis espaldas?"

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kthompson1213

Mano is the subject of the sentence not Ellos and mano is singular so you have to use Su not Sus.

-7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Hmmmm, no, 'mano' is not the subject of the sentence.

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/namayani

Would the sentence be OK like this "Ellos van a poner la mano aquí"? I know that in many cases where English would use a possessive pronoun, Spanish uses a definite article. E.g "wash your hands" vs. "lávese/lávate las manos"

9
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Yes, it is correct and natural

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

If it was my own hand I can see using "la" but when we are saying "Ellos" it seems to me that 'su' is a better choice.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

It seems to say that between them they have one hand.

7
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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Reminds me of the early lessons when everyone was eating one sandwich, or one strawberry.

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R3-D9
R3-D9
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Yeah, that didn't make much sense.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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yes, they rented one.

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bajaca
bajaca
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I think this sentence is ok. Say you were in a courtroom and were explaining/showing what the witnesses were going to do. They will come to the front. They will put their hand here (on the bible). They will swear....

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GriffLA

If you were in a court room in order to be grammatically correct you would have to either say "They will put their hands here (on the Bible)" OR "Each person will put his or her hand here (on the Bible)" but you can never say "They will put their hand here (on the Bible)" because the implication is there is only a single hand shared between the entire group.

Think of it this way.

Bob, Joe, and Jim live in the same house and share ownership of a single car. You can say, "They use their car to commute work" and be correct.

However what if:

Bob has his own car, and he drives it to work.

Joe has his own car, and he drives it to work.

Jim has his own car, and he drives it to work.

You must say, "They use their cars to commute work," even though each man is only driving one car (his own), because that is the only correct way of saying it.

If you said, "They use their car to commute work" the implication is that Bob, Joe, and Jim share ownership of a single car and in this last example that is not the case.

Regardless, sharing ownership is possible with a car. It is NEVER possible with a hand, which is why in NO case could you ever say, "They will put their hand here" and be correct.

If you really must insist on specifying that each person will only use ONE hand, you cannot use the plural pronoun "they" and the plural possessive adjective "their". You must change the sentence to use a singular pronoun such as "Each person" or "Each one" and use the singular possessive adjective "his or her" because that is the only correct way, in English, of saying "hand" in this case.

6
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrule
mrule
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This doesn't sound natural to me at all. I would have said "hands" in that context ( unless I was using "they" in the gender-agnostic singular sense ).

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lovedino

In English, you still have to say "their hands" to make it all consistent. For example, you would also say, "They lost their lives." In Spanish, from limited experience with such phrases, it seems to be the opposite. "Ellos perdieron su vida," was used earlier.

6
Reply15 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shadowqueene

In English it's still hands, even when it's only one each... confusing...

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellevan

I don't know why people get confused by these sentences. If you think it is "strange" then try to imagine when someone would say this.

For example, an art class was working together to make one hand sculpture for an exhibit. I could then say the sentence, "Ellos van a poner su mano aquí."

If that is still too abstract for you, "su" can also be her/his/your (formal). Replace "their" with any of those words and you will see the sentence isn't as strange as you are making it out to be.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanProbando

Good points nicely made :-)

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maudbenoit

Well if I picture a couple people tackling a bear and grabbing a paw can I use "its"?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellevan

Absolutely!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/glazewg

I think you have had the best comment to this discussion thread. This sentence sounds like someone is receiving instruction in modeling, before a photo shoot. Or, I suppose it could be instructions given from the Mafia boss. :) Either way, I don't see that we need to be concerned over a group of people sharing one hand. We all use very individualized sentences in everyday life that, when taken out of context, make no sense to others.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GriffLA

Hello all,

This is wrong in English, but not in Spanish, and I want to explain why once and for all. I posted this comment in Spanish under the English for Spanish-speakers module but I want to put it here as well.

Pronouns, verbs, possessive adjectives, and the elements they possess must be in agreement.

The problem here is that people are confusing the English idea of "Each one" with "Them". They are separate things grammatically.

"Each one" is singular and for that reason requires a singular form of the verb ("is"), a singular possessive adjective ("his or her"), and a singular element ("hand").

However, the pronoun "Them" is plural and requires a plural form of the verb ("are"), a plural possessive adjective ("their"), and a plural element ("hands").

Yes, you can use a singular element (for example, "house") with a plural pronoun and verb, but only when the element ("house") is a shared possession between members of the entire group.

For example,

You can say (with a singular pronoun, verb, and adjective):

"Cada uno (de ellos) va a poner su mano aquí."

"Cada uno (de ellos) va a poner la mano suya aquí."

"Each one (of them) is going to put his or her hand here."

...and you can use "hand" as singular in this case and it would be correct and make sense.

However, if you say "Them" in English, you must utilize the plural of everything (even if each person is only going to put one hand "here") and it would be:

"They are going to put their hands here."

The reason why you can never use the singular "hand" in English with "Them" in this case is because it implies "the hand" belongs to the entire group, for example,

"They are going to put their hand here."

How is it possible for one person to share a single hand?

There is a lot of confusion with respect to this question, and for this reason let's use "the house" in please of "the hand", because I think it's more clear:

"They are going to put their house here."

That is possible to say, because it means there is only one house, and "they" all own it together, and a group of people can certainly share ownership of a single house.

But a group of people cannot share ownership of a single hand!

I hope this helps!

IF you are still unclear, here is further clarification I left under the English for Spanish speakers version of this sentence:

I see there is great confusion regarding the concept of possession in the comments.

The problem is that here it is impossible for THREE DIFFERENT PEOPLE to jointly possess ONE SINGLE HAND and for that reason the phrase must use "HANDS" and not "HAND".

"They" is a pronoun, so let's use names instead. Let's say "They" means "Jill, Sue and Joe."

Now substitute "Jill, Sue, and Joe" for "They" and you will see why this phrase is wrong.

"Jill, Sue y Joe are going to put their hand here."

Seriously? That would mean that between Jill, Sue, and Joe there was only ONE hand --- their hand --- and the three of them somehow share possession of it!

Here is another example, I hope will be more clear:

"Jill, Sue y Joe are going to sell their house."

Okay, this would mean that between Jill, Sue and Joe there was only ONE house --- their house --- and the three of them own it, that is to say, the three of them share ownership of a SINGLE house. If that is the case, the phrase is correct.

However, if Jill owns ONE house and if Sue owns ONE (different) house and if Joe owns ONE (different) house --- that is, there are THREE houses, but each person only owns ONE --- you would say:

"Jill, Sue y Joe are going to sell their houses."

In this case you would not say: "Jill, Sue y Joe are going to sell their house" because that phrase implies there is only ONE house IN TOTAL and the three of them share ownership, or it is their communal property.

Even though each person only owns ONE house, and each person is trying to sell only ONE house, despite this you say HOUSES not HOUSE because each person owns their own house!

Lastly if you want to say "HAND" (and not "HANDS") you would have to change the phrase from "They" and "their" to "Each person" and "his or her", for example,

"EACH PERSON is going to put HIS OR HER hand here."

But you can NEVER say ""THEY are going to put THEIR hand here" because how can only a SINGLE hand be the property of an entire group?

I hope this clarifies things because I see there is a lot of confusion in the comments. I hope DuoLingo fixes this, because in English it's wrong (whereas in Spanish it's right).

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daveduck
Daveduck
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It's the "their" version of the English translation that has everyone's panties in a twist. Since "su" can also mean "your," and since this sounded at least grammatically logical, that's what I used, and that's what was accepted. Similarly, so would "his" and "her" work. "They are going to put your hand here [and then kiss it]." Etc.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suezq
suezq
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Spanish speakers only please, would we really say this? Is it hand or hands?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Hand in singular.

They are going to put their hand here. Sounds as if each one of them will place one of their hands at that specific place.

3
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gitanomama

"They will put their hand here " Not unless they share a single hand. However, one could say "they all gave him a hand" here "hand" doesn't mean the appendage, it means help.

1
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnie.sjoberg

This seems to be an idiom. I'd like to know what the English equivalent is. Does anyone know?

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I agree with you. I really hope this has a non-direct translation, which is why it's causing so much confusion! Otherwise it's just another wacky DL sentence :(

Maybe it means something like "They're going to make their mark here," or maybe if someone asks what part of a project "they" are going to work on, someone would reply "They're going to put their hand here."

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allelopath

A strange sentence

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattmoran

Why is su translated their? Shouldn't it be sus? Su is singular. Their is plural.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/downhand
downhand
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su mano -> singular, sus manos -> plural. it's not about he/they, it's about hand/hands.

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattmoran

Thanks. That's a tough difference to get used to.

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianStroh

I think this means "they are going to meddle in affairs which are not their business."

0
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

The expression to mean that is "meter las narices" (using the plural of nariz [nose]) rather than the given one.

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conradlovejoy

This sentence seams strange...as if the group in reference is going to put a collective/shared hand somewhere instead of each person in a group putting their hands somewhere. I suppose the sentence is technically correct as is, but would a native speaker rather say 'Ellos van a poner sus manos aquí'?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

I understand your point, but both their collective and their individual hand can be understood from this sentence in Spanish. Making it plural (sus manos aquí) means BOTH hands of all the people implied.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/conradlovejoy

Thanks for the input. That clears that up.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian_Brewer

It's a bit of an odd sentence, but I didn't have difficulty translating it. I'm wondering if it's a colloquial expression that means something like, 'They're going to get involved here' as in 'to have a hand in something'?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Santi_Minstrel

Not in Spain, at least

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterLukac2

Sus manos

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daveduck
Daveduck
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Folks, "su" can also mean "your," which makes the sentence perfectly logical, and which answer is accepted.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/akginger99

where are they going to put their hands??????

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bailarina12

I visualize a corpse being laid out in an open coffin! "They are going to put his hand here."! (you get to imagine just where that "here" is...) (this must be some kind of Rorschach test to probe our imaginations!! ;)

0
Reply4 years ago