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  5. "Mae hi yma ers sbel."

"Mae hi yma ers sbel."

Translation:She has been here for a while.

April 3, 2016

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Froggy_

why is this "she has been here for a while" and not "she is here for a while"? (In England, we do say the latter quite frequently, when "she" is still here!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

In Welsh the present is used for actions which have been and still are happening:

  • Rydyn ni'n byw yma am sbel - We have lived/have been living here for a while
  • Mae e'n gweithio yno am flwyddyn erbyn hyn - He has worked there for a year now.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverMundy

I feel that Froggy's original question is still unanswered: if the meaning one wishes to convey is specifically 'She is here [now and is to remain] here for a while', how is this done in Welsh? Would one perhaps use the future tense, on the grounds that the sbel implicitly extends beyond the present moment into the future?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

You can use either the present or the future with bod, really, although the future could also mean that she has yet to arrive:

  • Mae/Bydd hi yma am sbel

Generally there is enough context around these things to make the meaning clear - we cannot show that very well on Duo where there is generally just one sentence being given at a time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattJones596690

is it just coincidence that 'sbel' resembles 'spell'? as in 'she's been here for a spell'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Nope, not a coincidence -- according to the "GPC" dictionary, sbel is a borrowing from English "spell".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David456014

This is so procrustean. The welsh speakers say ""she is here her for a spell'. Where did while come from?

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