"Pamiętajcie o piciu wody."

Translation:Remember to drink water.

April 3, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

I would like to know, whether that is a naturally sounding sentence in Polish and whether 'Nie zapominacie pić wodę' is something more commonly used.

April 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

Well, you just wrote a statement, (you do not forget), imperative would be nie zapomnijcie/nie zapominajcie.

But to remind people to drink water all the time "Pamiętajcie o piciu wody." (In my opinion) is more natural

If it were a one time thing. (like after a training or sth),

"Nie zapomnijcie napić się wody"

sounds most natural to me.

April 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

For me "Pamiętajcie o piciu wody" or "Nie zapomnijcie o piciu wody" sound natural too.

April 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/losik55

Remember about water intake

April 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
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  • 926

Well, such a 'fancy' wording would be rendered by "spożywaniu" (spożywanie), I'd say.

April 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

Really? I would never use „spożywanie” with water(or any other fluid that isn't soup, for that matter) – nevertheless, "water intake" I would translate as „przyjmowanie wody”, so „Pamiętaj/Pamiętajcie o przyjmowaniu wody” or even more formal „Pamiętajcie o przyjmowaniu płynów”(but that's not literal, as „płyn” = 'fluid'). ;)

April 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 926

Hmm... that sure seems better indeed. At least for water. Anyway, the point is that it's too much for just 'o piciu' :)

"spożywanie wody" does have a few thousands results in Google, though...

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

Hehe, It happens that I sometimes find your options odd(but not wrong, just odd ;) ) – usually, when that happens, I comment of your post with the way in which I would say something, to give learners wider perspective of how natives use the language.

„Spożywać wodę” belongs to this category – while many people use it like that, for me „spożywać” connects semantically with eating, so it is just as odd as 'eating water'. ;)

That doesn't make it wrong though – as I'm sure you are aware, it's axiomatic that a native speaker can't really commit a mistake in his own language (because of how a language is defined :P), so since you said it, it's part of the language, but the learners now know that they might decide to employ a different verb with fluids and that was really the whole point. ;)

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei
Mod
  • 926

Well, recently you wrote something about "głowica prysznicowa", and I was like "WTF?!" about it, do you keep nuclear devices in your bathroom? :D Although now, when I googled it, it's clearly a different thing than "słuchawka" and I have no idea how I'd call that.

Well... I don't want to start a discussion, but I'm pretty sure that 'poszłem' or 'włanczać' are mistakes. So I'd never say that a native speaker can't make a mistake. One's idiolect is one thing, but the standard language has rules...

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emwue

Well, "really" was meaningful in my comment ;) – of course you can make mistakes against the „norma poprawnościowa”, but since that is more of a social contract than linguistic category(mostly), those are more of the "savoir-vivre" transgressions than linguistic ones – but I guess we mostly agree here. ;)

Well, I in turn just googled „słuchawka prysznicowa” and realised we were talking about different things – since that sentence was about shower, I was thinking about „kabina prysznicowa” equipment, the shower-like thingy that's part of tap above bathtub I would call simply „tusz”(which I'm quite sure is a „germanizm” from Dusche, but can't be bothered to check the dictionaries) . ;)

April 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

can you also say "pamiętajcie pić wody"?

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

It should be wodę in accusative. The genitive case is wody, used in negation in Polish.

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

oh right, but is it ok otherwise?

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mihxal

It would rather be "Pamiętaj, żeby pić wodę" or "Pamiętaj, żeby napić się wody".

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

Very interesting! Similar to Russian, but the second part uses instrumental case in Russian. ...napit'sja wodoj. Except Russian tends to say "don't forget," nie zabud'tie, rather than "remember," pomnit(ie).

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

nie zapomnij... makes me laugh every time hahaha! It's "don't memorize to drink water" in Russian LOL!

As far as the accusative case, воду (wodu), we say пить воду (pit' wodu),

Pić co? Wodę, the Polish equivalent

but when we use the reflexive verb напиться (napit'sja), we say with what or using what, hence the instrumental case. Напиться чем? (Napit'sja ciem? Napit'sja wodoj, sokom, piwom, koka-koloj, etc.) Напиться translates as "to drink oneself full with..." That "with what" translates as instrumental case. With water = водой (wodoj)

Also, the genitive of вода (woda) is воды (wody) in Russian.

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

OK, now I understand. Since this is a Polish for English course, I don't want to get too deep into Russian and Czech, but since we already drowned in it, might as well clarify, hahaha! I'll write in the Polish alphabet for people who don't read Russian.

(1) pić wodę = pit' wodu (imperfective)

(2a) napić się wody = popit' wody (genitive),(perfective), to drink some water

(2b) napić się wody = napit'sja wodoj (instrumental), (perfective) to drink as much water as it takes, until finished, in order to quench one's thirst, or just until full.

(3) upić się wódką = napit'sja wodkoj (instrumental), (perfective) This only works with vodka in Russian, in the sense that one drank himself full of it, regardless of whether it's an alcoholic drink or not. It's obvious that he is drunk because he drank himself full of it, but it doesn't mean "drunk" in Russian.

When we talk about drinking alcohol in Russian we say wypit' wodku (accusative), (perfective), but if there is no alcoholic beverage involved, then it just means "to finish a glass or cup of something," such as wypit' wodu, sok, piwo, koka-kolu, etc.

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Czaporka

It would be perfectly OK to say "nie zapomnij (żeby/aby) napić się wody" too. The difference is the aspect of the verb:

"Napić się" or "напиться (napit'sja)" is perfective.

"Pić" or "пить (pit')" is imperfective.

Although they have slightly different uses, I'd say both "nie zapomnij" and "pamiętaj" feel equally suitable for either of them.

By the way, are you entirely sure it wouldn't be "napit'sja wodu" (genitive) in Russian? To me it seems totally nonsense to use instrumental in this sentence, it sounds like "to drink by the use of water".

Cheers!

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Czaporka

Haha, didn't realise that. The coincidences between slavic languages are awesome. For example, the Polish word for "to seek" means "to f***" in Czech :P

Thanks for your explanation! So in Russian it's like you "drink yourself" with water just like you shave yourself with a razor. Makes sense! :-)

In Polish it would be instrumental case too if you get drunk with something instead of just drinking it - "to get drunk with water" = "upić się wodą".

Actually, now I think it's even more logical to use instrumental, haha.

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Czaporka

The Polish word is szukać and the Czech (bad) word is šukat. There are probably some differences in declension (in Polish, "I look for her" uses genitive but "I like her" uses accusative), but I guess you'd still have to think very carefully before you tell a big guy that you're "looking for his wife" xD

I'm still not 100% sure if we understand each other and I don't want to confuse you or any other people. By "get drunk" I meant a state one can only achieve through the use of alcohol. I used a bad example - one cannot possibly get drunk with water. So I'll try to summarize:

(1) "pić wodę" = (imperfective) to drink water

(2) "napić się wody" = (perfective) to drink some water (to quench the thirst)

(3) "upić się [wódką]" = (perfective) to get stoned [with vodka]

Are you saying that напиться means (2) or (3) or does it depend on context?

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/va-diim

@Czaporka, that's hilarious! So On jej szukaje​ means sex? LOOOOOL!!

So I think napit'sja translates as upić się more accurately​ in Polish than napić się. The usage sounds ​the same. "To drink oneself full with something"

May 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kat747761

Pamiętajcie pić wodę :)

May 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/kat747761

To Oleg. Nie zapominajcie pic wody :)

May 6, 2017
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