"Die Schüler besuchen die Ausstellung in Wien."

Translation:The students visit the exhibition in Vienna.

April 5, 2016

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nigeltart

I understand Student has a specific higher education meaning in German, but surely Schueler can mean schoolchildren? In the UK, maybe about 10 years ago, some education minister suddenly started referring to (secondary/11+) 'school students' instead of 'pupils'. Most young people now consider 'student' to mean 11+, whereas older people still insist on 'pupil'. Is there any flexibility in German, or is it more prescriptive?

May 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Querig

Better late than never:

"Schüler" refers to people going to any school other university: elementary school, grammar school, sixth form, driving lessons, language courses, cooking class,... (People associate "Schüler" with children, although there are enough instances where adults are the Schüler.)

"Studenten" are only university students. You can't really mix the two. Schüler are Schüler and Studenten are Studenten.

By the way, children in kindergarten / preschool are "Kindergartenkinder". In case you're interested ;)

May 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlak4

In SA we talk about scholars. Is this term used anywhere else?

March 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CapnDoug

Yes, "scholars" is used in American English. it is old fashioned and not heard often but people would understand it.

April 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AFulgens

"are going to" should be accepted here, or my English is off on this one?

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person243

I do not feel this sentence in German to be future. Also the "to be going to"-future is closest to the "werden"-future in German, while the "present"-future in German is closer to the "will"-future in English. At least in my regard. If there would be something like: "Die Schüler besuchen morgen die Ausstellung in Wien." You could probably argue that both the "will"- and the "to be going to"-future are working. But here I doubt that the future is good at all. It sounds more like it is happening right now. Hence: The students are visiting the exhibition in Vienna. Is good too.

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AFulgens

Sorry, I didn't mean future tense, but present continuous. I.e., I meant "are going to the exhibition" and not "are going to go to the exhibition".

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/person243

Well "visit" is more than "go". But you probably know that. If you "visit" an exhibition it means you go there and look at the paintings and tour around and spend your afternoon or at least a considerable amount of time there. If you "go" there, you could easily leave the second you arrive. The same is true for the German words "gehen" and "besuchen" (in this case).

I hope I could be of help.

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Binidj

"Schoolchildren" was corrected to "schoolboys" by Duo, Is "die Schüler" gender specific? Is there a gender neutral equivalent?

July 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Querig

Grammatically "die Schüler" are only the male students, "die Schülerinnen" are the female students. Grammatically. In actuality, nobody would assume that you are excluding female students when you say "Schüler".

In a group that is decidedly female, like PE class or an all-girls school you'd talk about "Schülerinnen", since there is no need to include non-existent male students. Obviously the same goes for a context in which female group members are not an option, and "Schüler" is not intended to include female students. But if you don't know or don't care about the sex/gender of the students in a group, you usually just say "die Schüler".

That's how German works: the generic masculine plural (sometimes even singular) includes female group members too. Of course there is a bit of a feminism debate about that, so many schools now refer to "Schüler und Schülerinnen" or, in written German, "SchülerInnen" (the capital i optically marking the merged words).

But that trend is not specifically about school students, that's a general issue between the feminist cause and the German language.

May 3, 2018
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