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https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

Duolingo is super. But I waste "temps précieux"

Experienced Duolingo users, help!

I am a self-motivated Duolingo-user, now studying French (my mother tongue is Norwegian). To me the gaming elements of Duo are more annoying than an inspiring bonus.

Lots of good things to say about Duolingo, BUT: I get annoyed being stopped from progress in studying French because of finger trouble on keyboard (I am not a good typist and probably have dyslexia-light) or inaccurate English. Any advice (other than slow down typing, proof read etc etc)? Will prlaying along (! typical Henrik-typo. "Playing along") with the gaming-stuff get me "extra lives" (hearts??) so that my weaknesses on keyboard and in English don't stop me?

Some more background: My main learning tool is a Spaced Repetition tool (Mnemosyne). For me it works really well (I have arrived at Eur level C1 in Italian and German using teh (ah!! typical typo) same approach)

For me Dulingo seems to be a very good supplement to Mnemosyne (Duolingo provides learning variety, seems to build up nicely and systematically from "basic" to "advanced", it improves my listening skills and my correctness in writing, grammar etc), and most importantly it provides good examples of learning-pairs (vocabulary or small sentences) that I copy-paste into Mnemosyne.

BR / Henrik

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/treiscuarenta

Hallo Henrik, hvordan har du det?

(I am not an experience duolingo user as I have only been using duolingo for 2 weeks but I have some comments that may help you.)

I am a native English speaker and I make mistakes when typing all the time! I don' think this is a non-native problem :) Most of my mistakes in duolingo are typos because I rush. I just re-do the lesson if I need to. I think there´s no harm in progressing a little slower if you´re making mistakes. Is it your vocabulary that you developed to C1 with Mnemosyne or all aspects of the language? C1 is impressive, well done! How much time did you spend on Mnemosyne to achieve C1 in Italian and German.

Ha det bra, Fintan. P.S. I can't speak or write Norwegian, I just looked up some sentences :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

Takk! Mnemosyne is my main learning tool, the self-diciplining backbone so to say (it has become my habit to do a little bit of studying every day). Once having reached a certain level, it is also a good tool to maintain that level (how many people have you met that say "my Spanish used to be really good, but now I can hardly say a word").

Besides Mnemosyne, I eagerly search out opportunities to speak, read, see films etc. (To me the spoken language is most important, hence also my irritation about the writing....

Italian: From 0 to B2: 8 years.. German: From A2 ( I did 3 years in school, 40 years ago) to C1: 1,5 years (For a Norwegian learning German is like getting a filter, after I while it feels like you can just "germanify" your Norwegian, and the the willing German person will understand...)

Ha det bra/ Henrik

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
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Hey Henrik,

I am dyslexic and often what I do is I dictate things. this is extremely easy to do on a mac or iphone, because it has the relevant software installed and you can download different keyboards/languages for free. I also feel it helps me getting more 'speaking' in the language in which I struggle a lot with (and often dyslexics do!). A lot of mistakes are overlooked by DL such as teh instead of the, generally if there is only one letter swapped it is ok (unless it results in a word of a different meaning). However, most of my mistakes are due to misreading the English sentence, so that I almost always mistake 'this' for 'the' or the other way around. the only thing that helps with this and the errors you described is to slow down. This can be frustrating in timed practice - I regularly finish that with 1 or 0 points, but if I force myself to slow down it works better. Good luck and kick dyslexia in the butt. What does not kill us only makes us stronger! (P.S. - this is, of course, spell checked. My handwritten english would not be this error-free).

Best Franky

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

:-) I will try dictate. And always kick you-know-what (mine is very mild)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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Bonjour Henrik, I'm sorry but I don't really see any way out of this other than type more slowly. I did loads of typos too, now it gets better, and I learned to re-read what I just wrote. I still make some typos, but for one thing there's less of them, for the second thing Duo does accept some of them and for the third and last thing if it's just a typo, you can correct it and only lose half a heart. You can buy an extra heart in the store, and if it's not enough, well I redo the whole lesson... Annoying, I know, but I take is as extra practice, which is never a bad thing. Bonne chance!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

Bonjour Oliwia et merci, "(...) extra practice, which is never a bad thing" I agree totally. Mnemosyne provides that for me, at the time when it is optimal and until i will never forget it :-)

AH! Can I "buy" extra hearts when I have lost the three? I seem to remember I tried that, and then got thrown out of learning-session. I will try again / H

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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I'm not sure that you can buy them during a lesson, but you can buy a "heart refill" in advance for some number of lingots (5, I think), which you can then use whenever you like to add an extra heart. The refill has an infinite shelf-life but can only be used once -- but you can keep buying more as long as you have the lingots to pay for them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/revdolphin
revdolphin
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There is an option to buy extra hearts in the store, but I think you need to do it before the lesson. I've never bought it myself, so I'm not completely sure how it works.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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Duolingo can't see what's in your mind: if Duo asks you to translate "je joue" and you type "I pray" instead of "I play", it might be a translation error, or it might be a typo. If Duo generously assumes that all such errors are typos, it will miss a lot of genuine translation errors. Duolingo does often forgive typos where they can't be grammatical errors: if you type "I playy" it will probably be accepted.

Note that this is also how the real world works: if I write to my friend in Slovakia but make a typo and write "Slovenia" on the envelope, it won't get to her. It doesn't matter that I know my friend's in Slovakia, because the post office is not telepathic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

Hi Pont. Well... I am studying French and I try to prioritise the way children learning mother-tongue have to prioritise: 1) listen and understand 2) speak and be understood 3) read 4) write

So, fairly happily I cram the fact that it is vous (not vouz), that it is "il mange" and "tu manges" (although the "s" makes no difference to what I hear it or or say it).

Less happy (but, do not misunderstand, not totally unhappy) to spend time learning that ”Pourquoi manges-tu autant de frites ?” in _English _is ” Why do you eat so many fries?” and not (my suggestion) ”why do you eat so much fries?” :-) / Henrik

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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I understand your situation; I'm simply pointing out that, when assessing a translation, it is often impossible to distinguish between comprehension errors and production errors.

The best solution, of course, would be a Duolingo Norwegian-to-French course; I think we'll have to wait a little while for that, though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/treiscuarenta

What is even funnier is that in the 2 replies below that speak about typos :) ....we both actually make typos in our own replies and I'm guessing they were not intentional ha ha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/0liwia
0liwia
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I do way worse: I keep writing words that are pronounced the same way but do not write the same and have obviously not the same meaning. Ex: I can easily write "I can here you" instead of "I can hear you". Weird, huh?

And I make weird typos, like "know" instead of "now", or the opposite. I would really like to now what's going on with my brain hear! ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danwizard2013
danwizard2013
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the good thing about the mobile app is you don't have to do lots of typing it gives you the words and you put them in order the down side to that is you don't actually think of the words yourself

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

Thanks. yes, I did notice. Myself I would love to see more of that on-line as well (in particular at basic level). Lets you spend max time checking your language skills, not your typing skill...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dessamator
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My best advice as an experienced (4 months Duolingo user), is that to progress quicker you need to progress slower. Haste makes waste, so the more you attempt to rush the more mistakes you make and the longer it will take you.

I love typing quickly and sometimes I don't read the sentence completely, as a result I may on average repeat a lesson about 5 times or more because of simple typos or because I don't pay attention or learn well enough from my mistakes. In truth, I haven't changed that behaviour because although it seems I'm taking a long time, it also forces me to repeat the lesson, and gain more exposure to the words or sentences.

But of course my method only works for the highly motivated, to me, at that stage, duolingo becomes a game, the more I lose a lesson, the more I want to do it again until I beat the silly little owl at her/his own game. Some people hate the prospect of losing though, so that may be counterintuitive for them. I think you probably have been through an education system, and many institutions, and at this point in your life, you've probably already uncovered what works for you. Use that to your advantage and learn effectively.

The purpose of a language is to communicate effectively, and rushing to do so may be ineffective.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HenrikMG

Thank you,

It is all about optimising the time spent. And I agree: To progress optimally with learning a language, you need to take the necessary time, and first of all get a sound foundation in place.

Rushing the wrong learning points is harmful to progress: Myself, I still repeat (5 minutes a day on average) Italian words and sentences that I started learning 10 years ago. But I spend my precious time today repeating only the part of my Italian that I am in danger of forgetting (that is the beauty of Spaced Repetition Learning).

So: instead of during the next month spending 10 hours getting the typing of English correct to get through 10 (just an example) Duo-lessons, I would love to be able to get it done in 5 hours: Learning French spelling and sounds and vocabulary, simultaneously saving all good learning pairs (the golden nuggets, that have special relevance for me) into Mnemosyne. After having obtained 900 Duo-points in French, I have found about 400 French "golden nuggets" that are saved in my Mnem. I have started repeating them.

The saved 5 hours i would rather spread over the coming 10 years to repeat and refine my French (in Mnemosyne).

I look for ways to minimise activities which gives me little desired learning.

:-) / Henrik

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hdcanis
hdcanis
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Slow down typing, proof read etc :)

I guess everyone makes typos and, well, no way getting around it, one just has to be more careful. And on that Duolingo is already quite forgiving, recognizing many typos as such (and occasionally marking as typos words where I just made regular mistakes...) But yeah, it smarts when I lose a heart for writing "cat" instead of "car". Or inexplicably writing "nous" when I am thinking "ils"...

And yes, as another English-as-second-language learner I too lose hearts for mistakes I make in English. Often mixing prepositions (in? on? at? what?) or missing or misusing articles, those are my usual problem areas...

But no cure for that, I just have to pat my own back for at least thinking it right and bear the loss of hearts...

4 years ago