"Mae'r ddannoedd yn ofnadwy."

Translation:Toothache is terrible.

April 7, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisMorga15

Should this be "the toothache" as there is a "'r"?

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Not in this case. The yr/y/'r is not always translated between Welsh and English, particularly with names of things, including some diseases, some countries and some specific events. For example:

  • yr Almaen, y Swistir, yr Aifft - Germany, Switzerland, Egypt
  • y ddannoedd, y diciĆ”u - toothache, tuberculosis
  • y Pasg, y Nadolig - Easter, Christmas
  • y Bala, y Rhyl, y Fenni, y Barri, y Bontfaen - Bala, Rhyl, Abergavenny, Barry, Cowbridge (names of towns)

Sometimes the y/yr is dropped in informal usage, though.

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1595

As is well explained above. Therefore 'Toothache' (without the definite article in English) is 'Y Ddannoedd' (with the definite article in Welsh)

April 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ffwlbart

Depending on context the English might use the definite article - for example 'the toothache is terrible but the earache is worse' or 'the toothache is terrible although the swelling has gone down'; but also: 'toothache is terrible and so is earache'.

April 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Froggy_

I agree wholeheartedly, Ffwlbart. "Toothache is awful" would be used when talking about the general condition, but when talking about a specific case, it would be "the toothache is awful", therefore both translations should be accepted.

April 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Cynphony

This doesn't make sense to me without an article. The toothache is terrible. A toothache is terrible. My toothache is terrible.

May 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/eAnnAe

But in a general sense, toothache is terrible... and no article is needed in English but it is required in the Welsh translation as above.

June 27, 2016
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