https://www.duolingo.com/L0ve3span0l

Irish Question

Do I need to know some basic Irish if I spend a holiday there? Or is English enough?

2 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

English is more than enough. You will never need Irish in Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L0ve3span0l

Okay :) Then I might pick up some language on my trip :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
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In most of Ireland, it won't be very necessary. However, on the west coast there are a lot of places known as the Gaetacht areas, where Irish is a very common language spoken by people there every day. One of the reasons I'm learning Irish because next year my family will go on a trip to Ireland, and some of our relatives are fluent Irish speakers who live in the Gaetacht areas :)

So, it depends on where you'll be going to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannah.Barnett

Oh how I wish to visit the Gaeltacht, but I don't want to be rude and speak English since I'm not good enough with Irish yet. It is my goal, however.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatty.Lumpkin

I'm actually heading off to Dublin next week. Unfortunately I doubt I'll even run into anyone who speaks Irish let alone be stuck for what to say to get about. Irish is a minority language and not spoken by the majority of the population. I dream of that changing one day though and all I can here walking the streets of Dublin will be people speaking happily to one another in their native language... (although of course I appreciate many people would argue that English is there native language but you get what I mean I'm sure :) )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

In fact it is quite likely that you will run into a lot of people who speak some Irish, but you won't know unless you ask them - the default language for the vast majority of people in Ireland will be English. If you ask Irish people An bhfuil aon Gaeilge agat? you will find people who have some Irish (though it may be very rusty!), and will be happy to exchange at least a cúpla focail (though it might not go much further than that).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatty.Lumpkin

I will have to challenge myself and at least once say to someone Conas a ta tu? I'd be so excited if they replied in Irish - the only sad thing is I don't know enough to carry on with the conversation - one day I hope that will change!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bemk92
bemk92
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I don't know how often it gets used, but something to look out for is an fáinne úr, or so I've heard.

https://cnag.ie/ga/glac-p%C3%A1irt/scoileanna/fainne.html

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

You won't see too many lapel pins these days, because many people don't have a lapel to wear them on, or, if they do, they don't want to be repeatedly adding and removing the pin every time they change their clothes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L0ve3span0l

Oh great! I'll visit that city as well.

I was just wondering because in Wales, all the street signs are bilingual (Welsh and English) so I thought it might be like that in Ireland

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatty.Lumpkin

I think the signs are bilingual there too, to be honest it is going to be my first time in Dublin next week for me so I'm not completely sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iwerddon
Iwerddon
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Yes, the signs in Ireland are bilingual. Helps you pick up some vocab, I guess. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L0ve3span0l

Tell me when you get back :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/patbo
patbo
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You'll definitely see the language there, but you might not hear it anywhere.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xkryssix
Xkryssix
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I just returned from Dublin and the signs are bilingual in a majority of the city. I know on the busses, you hear both the Irish and the English version of the street names and stops. I also picked up the fliers from some major sites as well that were in both languages. It was neat to try to figure out the literal translations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cinzia47
Cinzia47
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Visited Co. Mayo, Killarney, and the Cavan/Monaghan border (where my family comes from) in the last year but didn't hear any Irish spoken.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GokuSCR

On the future distant i want learn the language irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/L0ve3span0l

Any reason why?

2 years ago
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