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"Vera, you have no one to fear."

Translation:Вера, тебе некого бояться.

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dempl
dempl
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May I just say that in my language this literally means:

"Vera, you have someone to fear"

This entire lesson is upside down :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
zirkul
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Which language is that, if I may ask?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dempl
dempl
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Serbian.

Некога -> mean someone (genitive), Негде -> Somewhere etc. ...

Ruskies turned everything upside down, I tell ya ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
zirkul
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Actually, негде (somewhere), некогда (sometime), некто (someone) and некий (some, unidentified, with the genitive/accusative forms being indeed "некого") can be used in Russian with those meanings, but that would be either formal, literary or slightly archaic. So I presume we got it from the same root as Serbian. However, these are not commonly used in everyday speech.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaens
Kaens
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Huh, I've never seen "Негде" used like that. Care for an example, please?

...Okay, found something in pretty old Russian: Гдѣ радости сии болшии, еже сподобихомся видѣти отца и учителя нашего отшествие къ Богу, приимша венець нетлѣниа и нѣгде близъ престола Владычня предстояща всегда и дерзновениа имуще молити о нас Владыку? [What joy is greater than to get to witness our father and teacher's leave unto God, taking the wreath of incorruptibility, standing forever somewhere by the Lord's throne, and daring to plead the Lord for mercy upon us?]

Still nothing wrt using it as a literary device in relatively modern non-Church books however :

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
zirkul
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Can't think of a good example with "негде" right away (although easily with the other words I've listed), but in any case, here is one reference: https://ru.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D0%BD%D0%B5%D0%B3%D0%B4%D0%B5#.D0.BD.D0.B5.D0.B3.D0.B4.D0.B5_II

Curiously enough, before the reform, the two words were spelled differently: негде (nowhere) & нѣгде (somewhere).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaens
Kaens
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That's just like the Polish zapomniet' or whatever it's spelled means забыть (forget) in Russian but запомнить is to memorise...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mactuary1
Mactuary1
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Something wrong with Duolingo. The exercise was "Теперь ей никого учить" but the forum is about a different one.

Anyway, 1. according to ей she's the one being taught,

  1. but the English translation of "Now she has no one to teach." implies that she's the teacher.

I just want to confirm that it's 1 and not 2.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaens
Kaens
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"Ей никого учить" is bad Russian (should be некого), and you put two 1s and no 2s, but anyway it's "She has no-one to teach now". ей would be uhh <sub>literally</sub> "For her" here, so that should clear things up.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FelixGV1

How can one determine whether to use "некому" or "некого"? Do they both mean "no one"? I am confused.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaens
Kaens
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The first one is about nobody to do something. The second is about nobody to do something to.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SueFritz2
SueFritz2
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Thanks for this last explanation. It is helpful.

5 days ago