"Mae o'n licio chdi."

Translation:He likes you.

April 11, 2016

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NoelGoetowski
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(ÚuÙ#) Ydy o, nawr?

April 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshMassey3

blushes

August 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/susanescott
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Is chdi only objective case, or can it be used as a variant for chi elsewhere?

December 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Tinabelle7

is chdi south walian... I live and learn in the north and have not heard it before.

July 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/OwenPr1

I'm from Anglesey and I hear it all the time

August 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KathrynAlex14

I live in South Wales and have never heard it!

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CacenCwningen

Nope -- I'm from South Wales, and have never heard of 'chdi' before.

October 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fayrobertsuk

Again: her pronunciation is confusing...!

February 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeProcto6
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Why is "he does like you" marked as an incorrect translation? Isn't the "mae" a positive quantifier for emphasis?

June 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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No; it's the form of "to be" used for "he, she, it" and is used to form the present tense of verbs.

It's no more emphatic than the form of "to be" for, say, "I" (i.e. "dw") -- Dw i'n licio chdi would similarly be merely "I like you" and not "I do like you" (which might be dw i yn licio chdi with stressed yn).

June 22, 2017
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