"Er folgt eurem Hund."

Translation:He is following your dog.

April 13, 2016

38 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

As you can see, folgen takes an object in the dative case (eurem Hund).

There are handful of verbs that require an object in the dative, rather than accusative case.

(Other useful ones include helfen "to help" and danken "to thank".)

I don't think there's a good reason for "why" except for "that's just the way it is in German".

April 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

well, I guess it does go conform with the general role of dative objects as only indirectly affected (for folgen) or as receivers/beneficiaries (for helfen and danken). But of course it‘s easy to think of verbs where accusative objects fulfill these roles, e.g. jn. unterstützen (to support sb.).

In the case of danken there is also a second factor why the beneficiary is indicated with a dative object: danken can also take a second object in accusative case which denotes the cause of thanks: jn. etw. danken, for example: Deine Kinder werden es dir danken. This is extremely rare in modern German though (pretty much restricted to a few more or less fixed expressions); usually the cause for thanking is indicated with für + Akk.: Er dankte seinen Eltern für die Unterstützung.

April 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avery_Eubanks

Oh ok I was about to say “eurem” doesn’t make much sense to me. Could I think of this sentence as “He gives chase to your dog” just to make it easier to remember it’s dative?

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

If it helps you remember the dative construction, you can do that. As long as you’re aware that folgen doesn’t necessarily imply quick speed or even the object wanting to evade. Meaning-wise it’s pretty much the same as English “to follow”.

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avery_Eubanks

What’re the verbs that require dative? I’m kinda confused on which ones were decided to be dative

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Google is your friend ;) Here is a non-exhaustive list: https://www.thoughtco.com/frequently-used-german-dative-verbs-4071410

For some of the verbs on the list the syntactician in me would argue that either the dative argument is not strictly speaking an object (e.g. gelingen “to succeed, to turn out good”), or there are both a dative and an accusative object (e.g. glauben “to believe”). But from a learner’s perspective the important thing is that they can all take a dative argument without there also being an accusative one.

September 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGaromine

Is "he" suppose to be another dog, or is "he" suppose to be a spy that hunts dogs??

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Whatever masculine noun the speaker is currently talking about. It could be any masculine noun (well, folgen implies that the subject can change speed and direction out of its own accord, so it’s not a rolling ball or something). It could be another dog (der Hund) or a spy (der Spion) , a bird (der Vogel), a man (der Mann), a helicopter (der Hubschrauber)… Without a context we don’t know.

January 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haydenp3

Would "Er folgt deinem Hund" work?

February 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hedi76
  • 1347

Er folgt deinem Hund. = He follows your dog. (the dog of one person, Anna's f. ex.)
Er folgt eurem Hund. = He follows your dog. (the dog of two or more, Mary's and Paul's, f. ex.)

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Yes, that’s perfectly correct and should be accepted. Report it if it’s not.

February 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchonBaume

"eurem" means Your here, what are the other possessive pronouns like? is dein different with eurem??

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Depending on the addressee there are three possible translations:

  • Er folgt deinem Hund. (the addressee is du)

  • Er folgt eurem Hund. (the addressee is ihr)

  • Er folgt Ihrem Hund. (the addressee is Sie)

I hope that helps.

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchonBaume

Thank you, Could you please suggest link so that i can observe the rest of the possessive pronouns such as " meinem_deinem_seinem and.....?

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Giyf ;) you can see the whole paradigm here.

Don’t get too intimidated, though, it looks a lot more to learn than it actually is. In fact, probably only the stems:

  • 1st pers.sgl.: mein
  • 2nd pers.sgl.: dein
  • 3rd pers.sgl.: sein (m.), ihr (f.) sein (n.)
  • 1st pers. pl.: unser
  • 2nd pers. pl.: euer/eur- (the second -e- is lost when an ending is added)
  • 3rd pers. pl.: ihr
  • 2nd pers. polite = 3rd pers. pl.: Ihr

The endings are the same for all of them, and in fact the same as with the indefinite article, kein etc, so you should already know them.

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchonBaume

thanks.

April 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchonBaume

thanks.

April 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/borys.brod

Does this also translate to "He follows your dog" ?

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, it does.

January 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jnthsmth

I said "he follows y'all's dog" to test whether I truly understand plural second-person, but it marked me wrong. Does DL not understand my girlfriend's Texan I've picked up, or am I wrong about the sentence?

March 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hechap

You should report that to Duo - Y'all's may be regional and not be strictly "proper" English, but it is the best way to a clear understanding of the precise meaning of euer (and all its myriad declensions).

March 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

Am I the only one who hears "ihr" instead of "er"?

April 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

The female voice I get when pressing the button above sounds fine.

I know the German long e probably takes some getting used to for English native speakers seeing as English doesn’t have that vowel. But don’t worry, you’ll get an ear for it over time :)

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chartsman

I'm in no case an English native speaker but thank you for your response. :)

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolarOrbit

I agree. At least with the audio quality on my connection, I cannot differentiate ihr from er.

June 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Surajh1

Could someone please explain Dativ and accusative case in more detail? I'm having trouble understanding their definition

September 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Better think about them in terms of prototypical applications than rigid definitions. Accusative marks the thing that is directly affected by the action, the one it is performed on. Dative marks a more indirectly involved participant, most typically a recipient or beneficiary (the name “dative” actually comes from the Latin word for “to give”). But the way these prototypes are applied isn’t always straightforward. For example for folgen, it isn’t clear if the object should better be viewed as a patient or a beneficiary (a semanticist would say it’s neither and rather call it a theme) so I think it’s better not to try and analyse the functions more precisely. It’s probably more practical to simply get used to which cases are used with which verbs and use the prototypical functions of the cases a mnemonic rather than a reason for why this or that case is used.

Practically speaking, when a verb only has one object it will be an accusative one almost all of the time, so it’s probably most economical to remember which verbs do not use accusative. A few common ones which use dative:

  • jemandem folgen ‘to follow sb.’ (maybe because the object isn’t affected directly?)
  • jemandem helfen ‘to help sb.’ (the object is the recipient of help)
  • jemandem antworten ‘to answer sb.’ (the object is the recipient of the answer)
  • jemandem gefallen ‘to be pleasing to sb.’ (the object isn’t directly affected but only experiences an emotion, similar to the construction “mir ist kalt”)

There are even a handful of verbs which take an object in genitive case but those tend to be fairly high register and/or the genitive object can be replaced by a prepositional construction. (Also interestingly these verbs are usually reflexive, I don’t know.) For example:

  • sich einer Sache/an eine Sache erinnern ‘to recall sth.’ (in common speech it’s now much more common to use an + accusative rather than a genitive object)
  • sich einer Sache bedienen ’to make use of, to employ’
  • sich einer Sache vergewissern ‘to make sure of, to confirm’
September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AwadheshJh

can someone explain eurem vs deinem or eurer vs deiner etc?

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

euer, eurer, eurem etc. are things that belong to ihr (i.e. to several people)

dein, deiner, deinem etc. are things that belong to du (i.e. to one person)

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AwadheshJh

so why it can't be Er folgt deinem Hund. It was marked incorrect

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

If you had a listening exercise for this sentence, then you have to type what you hear.

If the voice says eurem Hund, you have to type eurem Hund and not deinem Hund.

If you didn't have a listening exercise but still ended up in this discussion, I don't know what could have happened -- it would help if you could make a screenshot, upload it somewhere, and paste a link to it in the discussion.

August 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samer712573

Why we don't say er flogt deinen hund

September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because

  • "to follow" is folgen, not flogen, so it's er folgt, not er flogt
  • the verb folgen requires the dative case, so it's deinem, not deinen
  • Hund is a noun and has to be capitalised.
September 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ahmed984945

How do I know that something is an inderect object or a direct object? Does it has something to do with the verb

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang
Mod
  • 213

Basically speaking, a direct object is the object or person directly affected by the verb action. You hit something, then that something is directly affected by the hitting. The indirect object is somebody (rarely an object) who is only affected in a more peripheral way. The stereotypical example is giving something to someone. In English, if there is only one object, people tend to speak of it as direct by default.

In German we don’t usually speak of direct or indirect objects but of accusative or dative objects (very rarely genitive ones), and yes, which one you need depends on the verb. 99% of the time if there is only a single one it’s accusative, but there are verbs with a single dative or genitive object, like folgen which needs dative (presumably because the followed person is not directly affected by the following). Other examples are antworten (to answer) and helfen (to help).

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caril2

I translated 'he follows the dog' which is not accepted. These phrases are interchangeable in English. Why is it not accepted

October 14, 2019, 9:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hedi76
  • 1347

"He follows the dog." means " Er folgt dem Hund." The translation of the possessive pronoun "your" is missing.

October 14, 2019, 10:17 AM
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