"Le conflit dure trente ans."

Translation:The conflict lasts thirty years.

6 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/fergusgrieve

I agree with lesliewilman: "The conflict has lasted for 30 years" is an entirely appropriate translation. This is an example of the present perfect tense in English. It is used, among other things, for actions that started in the past and are continuing at the present time – a situation for which French simply uses the present tense. I'm trying to imagine any possible situation where this sentence would be expressed in the present tense in English. All I can think of is the historic present – imagine a documentary voice-over: "It's the 17th century. War breaks out in Europe. The conflict lasts 30 years." Tough ask, duolingo!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gim306730
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It's the same for the French sentence, I can only imagine it in a doucumentary that uses historical present. In normal life, one would use either Le conflit a (déjà) duré trente ans or Le conflit dure depuis trente ans. Le conflit dure trente ans can only be narration.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lanexx
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Or, "In the movie, the conflict lasts 30 years, but in the book it lasts 50."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sally410

Fergusgrieve, I agree that this would be very unlikely to exist in English, in real life, without a word like 'Imagine' probably being involved. It could be a narrator's tense/sentence structure. Your documentary example for instance, that style has been used a lot in films. Hope you have a book to follow, it sounds really interesting! :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Libellule808
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Nonsense. It's just the present tense. This lesson is about political vocab, not about verb structure. Hence the simple present tense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce878691

I think my answer of "The conflict is lasting thirty years" is perfectly acceptable English usage.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

What does it mean to you?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce878691

It means the war has gone on for thirty years and is continuing. I guess it IS a bit awkward usage after all!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisriley
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You would never say 'The conflict lasts for thirty years' in English. If it was a conflict in the past it would be 'The conflict lasted for thirty years' If the situation was still current you would say "The conflict has lasted for thirty years' or possibly even, 'The conflict is thirty years old' or 'The conflict still exists, thirty years later'

The only way I can see the expression being used in this form is if a narrator was explaining the passage of time as it unfolded in a movie or play and said 'The conflict lasts for thirty years'. You would have to see the situation unfold before you rather than explaining an era in history.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
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French (like Spanish and Italian) often uses the "historical present tense" to make past events seem more real. In English, this sounds like teenagers giving a breathless account, but we do use it. "So the king, he just takes the girl. Then the other king, he declares war on the first dude. The conflict lasts thirty years. Then they don't even want her back!"

In Immersion, I always translate the historic present tense into the English past tense, but it's not true that we never say it in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buzzmcr
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I don't think the historical present is entirely colloquial. Maybe traditionally, but these days I often come across it in documentaries, almanacs or timelines in news media, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliewilman
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The usual expression in UK English for a conflict still in progress, to translate the French present tense, is "The conflict has lasted (for) thirty years." If it has finished, like the Thirty Years War, for the French "a duré" or "dura", the English would be "The conflict lasted ...". If you were speaking about a time halfway through the TYW, the French might be, "..durait quinze ans, quand..." and the English " had lasted fifteen years when.."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/oulenz
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My impression is that «the conflict goes on for thirty years» is more natural, and I've reported it (28 February). Thoughts?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConnorCockapoo
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The conflict has lasted 30 years is just simply a better answer than either of the answers Duolingo provides. I'm sorry, it's the right answer, and their answers are not as good in colloquial English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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As explained by GregHullender (above), this is referred to as "historical present" and in this particular case, "(has) lasted" is accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MirandaBea3

If "The conflict lasts for thirty years" is accepted, then why not also: "The conflict is lasting for thirty years"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

Much of my comment to DonaldHami applies to your sentence suggestion as well, given the progressive aspect combined with the limited time frame.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bethany986

Does anyone know why the correct sentence is "Le conflit dure trente ans." rather than "Le conflit dure trente années"? ie is there a difference?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
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You might find this interesting and helpful - http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=9547

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Ah, thank you. DL does accept "Le conflit dure trente années" when translating in the other direction, but I see from the link you posted that immediately after a number, it is more usual to use "ans".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SunilNatraj

The war has lasted thirty years should be accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
Mod
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That is referred to as "historical present", explained above by GregHullender. It is accepted in this context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

To be clear, "has lasted" is the present perfect tense, whereas the historical present, as mentioned by GregHullender, is not a tense per se but the use, in general, of the present to narrate past events, which is slightly different.

Whereas the English present perfect "has lasted" could work in a historical present context, I don't think it would have the same meaning.

An example of the historical present incorporating the present perfect: "It is July 1916. The war has lasted two years (and will ultimately last two more)."

An example of a sentence analogous to Duo's sentence, using the simple present tense: "War breaks out. It lasts four years (in total)." This is also the historical present.

These are two different contexts, requiring different tenses, but both are the historical present.

I don't think "has lasted" is a valid translation of the French here. I could be wrong, but I'd need a convincing example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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Your clarification is on point. Historical present would be "lasted" with the understanding that it is not a literal translation but a translator's choice. It is the responsibility of the translator to know when historical present is appropriate and to use it consistently for the duration of the story.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

That would be "Le conflit a duré trente ans."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeWalker46
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Why not "The conflict endures thirty years"? It means the same thing, and it's a good mnemonic for English speakers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

Seems okay to me, though the senses of "last" and "durer" are more similar in their relative simplicity, I think.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnetteFierro

Mine should be accepted: The conflict is lasting thirty years

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonaldHami
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"The conflict is going on thirty years" is currently marked incorrect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

Hm. Not impossible in English, perhaps, but there are a couple of issues.

One is that your verb has a progressive aspect ("is going on") but you're limiting it with respect to time ("30 years"). I think this would only work if you were using the present tense to make a statement about the near future, i.e. you were declaring how long the conflict would last, from either within the time frame of the conflict or slightly before it – in other words you were saying something synonymous with "I declare that the conflict will last for thirty years, and that's that".

I suppose it's possible that the French could have this meaning, too, so it's not entirely out of the question, but using the simple present in English ("goes on"/"lasts") is better, as it takes away this limitation and opens the sentence up to be interpreted as the historical present as well.

The other issue is that "going on thirty years" can mean "approaching thirty years", as if you were saying about a person, "he's going on thirty" ("he's almost thirty"). I don't think this is a meaning covered by the French sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SunnyTso1

"The conflict has lasted for thirty years." sounds to be a better answer in English.

1 year ago
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