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https://www.duolingo.com/Erika-AJ

How Fast Should I be Learning a Language?

I'm mostly seeking advice here... how fast do you think a person should learn a new language? At times, I would like to simply study the basics for months on end, and at other times I want to reach the end of a course in five minutes. I know this in't exactly a problem, but I'm just curious if anyone else successfully learned a language with Duolingo, and how fast or slow did they learn it? ~ Thank You <sub> ^</sub>^

2 years ago

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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Why don't you tell us a little more about why you are learning Spanish? Do you have a particular goal for the language? Also, how many resources do you use to learn the language?

If your goal is to be fluent and to have conversations in it then take your time. Some lessons will be easier and you can do those quicker. Some will be harder and you might want to split them up.

If your goal is to know a little Spanish but not necessarily be fluent then you can go a little faster.

The only wrong way to learn a language is to not try at all.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeyItsOcarina
HeyItsOcarina
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Well, it all depends on your native language, as mine is English, people say that most likely Danish is easy (for a new language) or Tok Pisin (language spoken in Papua New Guinea as an English creole), but for me the easiest languages to learn were as follows (toughest at 1, easiest at 10):

  1. Thai (Thai was a challenge, but hey, I'm still learning it, getting easier as I go)

  2. Chinese (ALL THOSE CHARACTERS :|, still learning )

  3. Arabic (Still learning, writing system was hard, progressing makes it easier)

  4. Kazakh (Still learning, pronunciation at times was hard, progressing makes it easier)

  5. Mongolian (Some parts were hard, getting easier)

  6. Basque (Still learning, pretty nice)

  7. Japanese

  8. Armenian

  9. French

  10. Bulgarian

TL;DR

In short, how long it takes to learn a language all depends on your native language, experience with the language you're learning, and if you are interested in that culture and language to push yourself to learn their language.

I encourage you in learning, and Cheers, Ocarina.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Usagiboy7
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I'm 916 days in and still learning Spanish. For most people, studying a language first takes several years to get a good grasp, and then regular usage to maintain that grasp.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xefjord

I would say it depends. If you are someone who loves going fast, then by all means, fly through the lessons and finish the whole course in a week or two. If you are someone who goes slow, go a lesson a day and review it numerous times before moving on. However I can tell you, in the end you should have still spent the same amount of time reviewing. You can fly through the course within a week or two, but you will still need to review everything for a few months more every day for it to stick. While going slow and reviewing things often as you go finishing up after a few months is about the same. Not everyone has the endurance to fly through the course then just do mindless reviewing for months on end. And not everyone has the patience to take it slow. So just find your happy medium.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveBoss
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Completing the lesson tree and learning a language are not one and the same. From personal experience, having worked at it very diligently for 6 months now, with a prior basic knowledge of Spanish, I can read pretty well, speak moderately, write moderately, and have much difficulty understanding what is said to me. To "learn" a language, you need to supplement this with other things == ideally going somewhere where you only can speak that language for at least several months, or you go hungry. If you can't do that, watch TV, listen to music, go to movies, find a fluent friend, review other free Spanish language resources on the internet which focus on other types of lessons. But then again, it all depends on your goal for what you want to learn and what you want to do with it. Get to work!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Purple.Girl

It depends on how often you practice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imflashdelirium

Just to stand as an example: I've been studying Italian in Rome since October (excluding the year before I spent on Duolingo) and I have now finally achieved B2, infact in June I am planning to take the CELI in C1!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-BellaLuna-

It all depends on how much you study. If you study less or in Usagiboy7's case, busy, you should expect to be done in a long period of time. If you study a lot, expect to be finished in a short amount of time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/S_Mac86

Here's a good article on the subject (for the french language specifically).

https://frenchcrazy.com/2011/08/how-long-does-it-take-to-become-fluent.html/

The author of this article suggests an estimated 2 years with immersion and 4-6 without.

2 years ago