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"No habrá arroz en tu casa."

Translation:There will be no rice at your house.

4 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BuceriasBecky

I'm confused. I thought habra (no tilde on my keyboard - sorry, but imagine it's there) meant he/she/it/there will have and haya meant i/he/she/it/there will be. Why don't we use no haya arroz en tu casa ????

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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"Haber" has many meanings, all depending on context. It can mean "he/she/you-formal/it will have" when it's being used as an auxiliary verb with a past participle: Ella lo habrá comido=She will have eaten it. However, when it stands alone without a past participle by it, it talks about existence: "haber"=there + [to be]. Therefore "habrá"=there will be. Also, when "haber" is being used to talk about existence it is only used in the singular 3rd person (Hay, Había, Hubo, Habrá, Haya, Hubiera, etc...). "Haya" can only be used when the subjective is required. E.g. Dudo que haya arroz=I doubt that there is rice, or Espero que haya arroz=I hope that there is/will be rice. http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/haber_intro.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Small correction: "when the subjunctive is required." "Haya" is subjunctive mood, (not "subjective"). "Habrá" is future tense indicative.

This additional website might give additional help: http://www.practicingspanish.com/grammar10.html

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

Another small correction. "Haya" can also be used in the imperative, meaning "Let there be"/"May there be."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NyamNyamNy1
NyamNyamNy1
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A small note for the tilde problem - if you are using a windows keyboard, you can press the "alt gr" key to the immediate right of the space bar to get a vowel with an acute accent (Á,É,Í,Ó,Ú,á,é,í,ó,ú). Else, just copy and paste from here: https://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000657.htm

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/judit-sama
judit-sama
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No more rice for you!! >:(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnySiciliano
JohnnySiciliano
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LOL! ie: No soup for you! The rice nazi!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amzis
amzis
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There will be no rice in your house - sounds like the worst curse for an Asian :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnySiciliano
JohnnySiciliano
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Don't know when you wrote this post, but when looking up haber and it's uses, I saw this. It's struck me funny. Are you an Asian?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephem61
stephem61
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Just lost my last life by not putting an apostrophe in wont. Raging

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

DL Is pretty good at excusing typos - unless the mistake actually makes another word. In this case "wont" as in "one's customary behaviour".

E.g. "He did not type the apostrophe, as was his wont".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/breqwas
breqwas
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Thank you for teaching me a new English word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecile-Tinturier

You taught me a new English word too!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I know but I keep typing in for en when I am typing fast. Too bad Duo doesn't recognize standard typos per idiot like me lol.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roentgen89
Roentgen89
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...are you wont to omit apostrophes?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malcontex

I wonder if stephem61 rage quit over this. Maybe studying over on Livemocha now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/super_crayola

i wrote home instead or house. fml

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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It is a matter of context. Here are two related sentences I found using this construction.

  • No habrá arroz para el consumo nacional en al menos 5 meses del 2015.

  • Esta semana no hubo azúcar, la otra no habrá arroz, imposible conseguir carne.

The lesson phrase could easily be part of that conversation speaking of a hypothetical future where there will be no rice in your house.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavelmeshchanov
pavelmeshchanov
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I am wondering what it is: a gloomy wish? Or a known fact?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RoeCocoa

I was trying to decide if it was a threat or a promise.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lianet491526

That is an insult you know the person that is saying that is saying that his or her house is poor wow! what a friend!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aguilarbrian

Home should have been accepted as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Yes, technically it means the same thing, but "hogar" is the word for "home" in Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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Well, there is some overlap, in certain contexts:

  • La casa = the house
  • En la casa = at the house, in the house, at home
  • En casa = at home
  • El hogar = the home
  • En el hogar = at the home, in the home, at home
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

I think the overlap is because of the limitations of translation into English, hence "at home" for en casa, because there is no other choice really in natural English. If the phrase, however, is en mi/tu casa, though, the English translation quickly reverts to "at my/your house." Hogar in Spanish is definitely "hearth and home," and hogar also means "hearth" and "fireplace," dating back to the days when fireplaces provided warmth and people cooked food in pots hanging in the hearth, the epitome of the comforts of a true Home which was in a large part centered around the hearth, in front of which people gathered, socialized, and shared meals. So, translating casa as "home" is more a necessary quirk of translation than of anything else.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/herbert1985
herbert1985
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Politicians advices in Duo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunrises
sunrises
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Is this Spanish literally saying, "There will not be rice at your house" or is it "There will be no rice at your house"? Duo accepts both. They seem different grammatically, and I wonder -- Does one have the freedom to apply "NO" to either the verb or the noun?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

In English, I would say, "There won't be rice at your house." That was my translation here, and Duo accepted it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

The "no" is applied to the verb, not the noun. The correct translation is that "There will not be rice...".

I think that to say "There will be no rice..." one could say "No habrá ningún arroz..."

But I think that second construction is uncommon in Spanish, which is why DL allows both English translations for the first version.

Any native Spanish-speakers who can comment?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnySiciliano
JohnnySiciliano
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A Spanish speaker would say "Hay no arroz," as a matter of fact period. This may be the difference the Spanish elite and the Spanish granjeros!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

In spanish the no is usually applied to the verb, but not always the case in english as you demonstrated. In spanish, if you do the same thing, it would almost always be incorrect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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I think this is really the "suppositional future tense" and it really means "There must not be any rice at your house."

"A New Reference Grammar of Modern Spanish: Fifth Edition" (Butt and Benjamin, 2011, section 14.6.5 "Suppositional Future")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

The suppositional future could be used here (although I'd suggest the translation "There's probably no rice at your house"), but that usage seems a bit beyond the level of DuoLingo.

For others who are wondering what suppositional future means...

The suppositional future uses the future tense conjugation to indicate likelihood or probability in the present (i.e. things that you suppose are true).

E.g.

  • Tendrás hambre = You must be hungry.
  • Ella estará lista = She's probably ready.
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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That's a subtlely I think I will gloss over for now :P

Edit: Actually I think we also have that in English.

For your first example:

  • Have you eaten anything?
  • No.
  • You will be hungry then.

Here "will be" carries the meaning of "must be" or "are probably/likely".

For your second example:

  • She will be ready by now.

Here "will be" = "should be" or "is probably/likely".

Edit 2

Other examples I found:

  • Don't ring her up now. She will be watching her favourite TV programme.
  • I don't know the answer, but ask her, she will know.
  • I haven't got my dictionary here, but she will have one.
  • She will be at work by now.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnySiciliano
JohnnySiciliano
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Mr Briden, You are a very bright man. English background? Very astute with "Las reglas"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SyamkumarR
SyamkumarR
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Can't it also be "no va a estar arroz en tu casa"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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No, because that would be "Rice is not going to be in your house". "Haber" needs to be used because you're talking about existence, not location or condition (which would use "estar").

There + "to be"=Haber

http://spanish.about.com/cs/verbs/a/haber_as_there.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregIhnen

The fast recording says "no habráruz en to casa". This does not sound correct at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasciu
Jasciu
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Why is it that the form "habra" is not in the conjugation table?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoomBom
DoomBom
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Is it like a Chinese curse or something?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

"When I'm through with you, there will be no rice at your house! Mwahahahahahahaha!"

(This sounds great in a Darth Sidious voice...)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EldritchOctopus

Is it just me or is this phrase just a little too ominous?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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If the worst ominous prediction I ever hear is there will not be rice in my house, I am OK with that especially since it didn't even say nunca or jamás. I think it's more like after you finish making all the arroz con pollo for the party there won't be any rice for the rice pudding.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogzincdlp

for the native english speakers: does "in your home" sound weird? or "at your home"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eva_P.
Eva_P.
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I think of "in your home" as literally inside. "At your home" can be outside. I usually use it as "at your house." The fire truck is at your house. Do you have an emergency?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogzincdlp

Thanks! That helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JPNachabe

What the hell does this mean?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

The translation seems to me somewhat different. But anyway, my ear stumbles more on the 'at your house'. La casa obviously means both 'home' and 'house' ; it's the context of 'house' that puzzles me. Is there a word for 'home' in Spanish - at least some coll. expression. I'm used to 'home' in many other meanings differing of those of 'house' ( "My home is my CASTLE" - or my house is my home?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The fundamental meaning of casa is house The only time it is translated as home is in expressions where it does not have an article or possessive adjective. It is the difference between saying Voy a la casa (I am going to the house) and Voy a casa (I am going home. The reason for the difference is that to the house can mean to your house or to any house that you are basing something out of temporarily. But going home. means your own place, which is what is meant when you omit the la in Spanish. In most cases hogar means home. It also means hearth, which makes some sense because home and hearth have been long linked together. But I have no idea whether Mi hogar es mi castillo would be said in Spanish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngochung72
ngochung72
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"There will be rice in your house" doesn't have meaning.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpk0721

I love DuoLingo, but it's sentences like these that make me scratch my head... I get that we're just trying to translate but would anyone ever say "There will be no rice at your house" - as if it were being predicted, like a fortuneteller? This is just not a sentence anyone would ever use in practice.

EDIT: I see a lot of other comments with similar complaints. I agree!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

is this some idiom describing a bad football player .... otherwise why is it in sports?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunrises
sunrises
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Thanks, CattleRustler. That helps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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Normal English would be, "there will not be any rice at your house".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InternalCorp.

how is "There will be no rice at home." wong.EVEN GOOGLE TRANSLATE GAVE THAT ANSWER

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"hogar" is "home",

"house" is "casa

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jpk0721

It may be a similar translation but not an exact one. DuoLingo is looking for specific translations. "There will be no rice at home" disregards the word "tu" in the Spanish sentence. Whose home is it?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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In fact at home implies the home of the speaker not the home of the hearer, so it actually doesn't even convey the correct message. We know from the fact that the sentence has tu casa that the house was not shared by the speaker.

5 months ago