"Nous aurions été prêts."

Translation:We would have been ready.

January 15, 2014

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LolPepper

I heard "près" (which seemed logical enough) in place of "prêts"; is there a difference in pronunciation between the two?

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bibiz12

Nope there is unfortunately no difference between "è", "ê" and "e" followed by a double consonant.

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LolPepper

So my answer really should have been accepted? I'll report the fault.

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Khajiit7952

No, there's no reason why it would've been pres

July 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlieHassett

You can't finish a sentence in french on a preposition, if it was to be PRES, it would have to have ended like: ils aurions été près de nous.

August 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

But also no reason why it couldn't have been - "We could have been near/close." Yes?

October 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlieHassett

When the noun is masculine, they are identical in sound but when the noun is feminine, prêt becomes prête and then you pronounce the T at the end.

August 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alc1997

I might be crazy but I think when people speak this there is about 1/3 of a T at the end. It might be geographical (Québec) though. also I think the vowel is slightly different. the è being a little farther back in the mouth ( not that that's easy to hear)

plus the "près" would be "proche" would it not?

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bibiz12

I think you're right it's regional, in Québec the pronunciation is very different (even the vocabulary is) than in France and they might pronounce the T. But done in France there would be a confusion, as "prêT" sounds too much like "prête", wich is feminine for "prêt".

January 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johaquila

According to Wikipedia, the opposite is true for Québec French pronunciation: The t is not even pronounced in words such as correct, reste, ministre(!), texte.

As you are no doubt exposed to a lot of European French, this might create an equivalence in your mind between the pronunciations with and without t, so that you hear the t even when it is not spoken. These equivalences operate on a very low level and are unconscious. (They are also to blame when English r and French j are very different sounds to us, whereas in fact they are extremely close and the Chinese sound written r in Pinyin is somewhere in between and sounds sometimes like the one to us and sometimes like the other.)

March 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

What I hear, here in Canada, is almost a glottal stop after the vowel, the "è" is chopped quite short without the "t" actually being pronounced at all.

July 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

…but for that sluggard Henri!

December 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amermaqbool

Prets is plural even though avoir is used as an auxiliary?

June 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johaquila

Yes. In Romance languages, adjectives agree in gender and number with the nouns they refer to - in almost all situations.

June 2, 2019
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