"Мы никогда не ссоримся."

Translation:We never argue.

April 20, 2016

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Ghaek

So in Russian you say "never not" (никогда не)? In that case, it is exactly like in Catalan (mai no) -> Nosaltres mai no discutim (lit. "We never NOT argue").

September 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Vik84w

Yes, Russians commonly use double and even triple negations, for instance: Мы никогда ничего не делаем - we never do anything.

October 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LukaVukZrinski

Part of the beauty of Slavic languages ;)

June 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

Katzner's Russian-English dictionary freely translates никода as "never" or "ever" when translating into good idiomatic English. The same for Ничего ("nothing" or "anything"). You don't really have to consider either a double-negative - just don't translate either in the positive sense without не as part of the process.

March 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/duolingoHepCat

Is there a special pronunciation with this double c? Is it more of a hissing sound that a single c?

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1460

I noticed that the computer-generated pronunciation of double consonants in Russian is, shall we say, lacking. The key to pronouncing any double consonants is Russian is to follow the first sound by a short pause and then pronounce it again. Practice it with a distinct pause and then try shortening it as much as you can while still keeping the sound distinct from that of a single consonant. With DL's pronunciation, I cannot actually distinguish double consonants from the single ones.

April 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina

That is how the Italians and the Japanese pronounce their doubled consonants. For example, "pizza" in Italian is "piz-za" (https://translate.google.com/#it/ru/pizza) and "konnichiwa" in Japanese is "kon-ni-chi-wa" (http://forvo.com/word/konnichiwa/#ja).

(It is also apparently how to pronounce doubled consonants in Elvish. ^_^ Recall when Gandalf says the Elvish word for "friend" in The Lord of the Rings - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgHCM68KkPY)

May 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

Does this also apply to n and m?

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1460

It definitely applies to "n". "H" in the name Aнна should sound distinctly different from "н" in "она" (she). Not so much with "m" though: коммунизм (communism) is pronounced as though it had a single "м".

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

Thanks, I need to check these out in Forvo, since I've heard нн pronounced in the Finnish way (no pause, just streched very long).

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1460

Really? I hear the double "н" here clearly: http://forvo.com/word/%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BD%D0%B0/#ru (in all three recordings). That said, the double "н" is not always pronounced that way (now that I thought about it). It is commonly found in many Russian passive participles: сказанный (said), сделанный (made) etc. where the pronunciation of the double "н" is much less articulated (even though I can still clearly hear it e.g. here: http://forvo.com/word/%D1%81%D0%B4%D0%B5%D0%BB%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BD%D1%8B%D0%B9/#ru )

What would the Finnish way of pronouncing double consonants?

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

I think I sort of hear it in the first example, but the others sound like just one long n. Here's the first word I could find with double n http://forvo.com/word/k%C3%A4nnyk%C3%B6ill%C3%A4/ (with/by mobile phones). Here's short n for comparison http://forvo.com/word/munissa/

Here's double k http://forvo.com/word/rakkaisiin/ Which is essentially just longer silence than in short k (which you can hear in kännyköillä). And here's double l http://forvo.com/word/illalle/ again just longer version of l http://forvo.com/word/kalotti/ .

It's interesting to know what you hear in these! After all it's not just about what is being said. It's also what we assume is being said. One "fun" fact is that even though Finnish has strict categories for long and short phonemes, the the longest short phonemes are actually longer than the shortest long ones :D Finns aren't aware of it! They think they hear something that doesn't actually exist :D I have no idea how foreigners are able to learn this! And actually, many don't.

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

Weird. I don't hear it in Forvo either and my phonetics book says Russian has long consonants that are pronounced the Finnish way. In IPA these are marked for example [n:] instead of [nn] which would be two separately pronounced similar consonants (I think).

April 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877

To me, the double-c sounds like the "ss" in "hiss", so I practiced by saying "hissorimsa" then just "-ssorimsa"

March 26, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AnTesla

Double "c" sounds different. For example: ссо́рить (cause to quarrel) - [ˈsːorʲɪtʲ], сори́ть (to litter) - [sɐˈrʲitʲ].

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/chirelchirel

The IPA symbols seem to indicate that the first one is a long s instead of two short ones and not what zirkul explained above. I'm still confused by this :D

May 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ghaek

What is the diference between ссориться and обсуждать? And is дискутировать really used?

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1460

They are not even close.
Ссориться = to quarrel;
спорить = to argue (as in "to argue with somebody" or "to argue about somethig", not "to argue a point" - that would be "аргументировать");
обсуждать = to discuss (no animosity is implied).
"Дискутировать" is used, but not commonly. It means something like "to have a prolonged discussion".

May 2, 2017
Learn Russian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.