"Nhà ga, đu quay"

Translation:The train station, the ferris wheel

2 years ago

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/babbeloergosum
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I'm grateful that the contributors have set their priorities right so "ferris wheel" is among the first words I learn in this language :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/polkadotmouse

I guess they ran out of words that are simple enough to start with each letter in the Vietnamese alphabet (Vietnamese words tend to get long so I guess we're learning the word for ferris wheel!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mathso2
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Đ and Qu in the same word - double bonus!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reagonomics

I was just wondering how common ferris wheels are in Vietnam that I should encounter this word so early.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Songve

Common in big amusement parks around Saigon.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsphnchls

I think they are showing us simple words because Vietnamese words can get very long.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vortarulo
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No, they don't. Vietnamese words are usually 1 syllable long, sometimes 2. Most of the longer words are simply compounds made of other shorter words.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

They can get fairly long but not as long as many European languages because tones provide the distinction that other languages don't possess. Sometimes the Vietnamese word is actually longer than the English (spelling-wise, not necessarily syllable-wise).

An example is "affirmation" vs "lời khẳng định". The English word has 4 syllables but only 11 letters while the Vietnamese has 3 syllables but 12 letters in addition to the markings.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne
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Vietnamese is the first language here to have "ferris wheel" in its vocabulary! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iainsona
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You truly speak from experience ... with TWENTY-ONE languages here! Impressive!

Out of curiousity, how do you get Catalán to show up with your English-based courses. At least with me looking at my own lists above, my Catalán is missing ... trapped in the Spanish version of this wonderful website.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mayorgatellez

You have to switch to the Spanish version of Duolingo to add that course. Anyway, you can switch back and forth between different language-based courses without resetting your progress.

Go to https://www.duolingo.com/course/ca/es/Learn-Catalan-Online and click on Switch to course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schmerpin
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What's going on etymologically when "đu đủ" means papaya and "đu quay" means ferris wheel?! What does "đu" mean?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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"đu đủ" just means "pawpaw/papaya". Each syllable has its own meaning which doesn't literally contribute anything to the whole word. This word is among those we call "tricky words" (one syllable is doubled or, sometimes, tripled with/without its tone mark changed to make totally new words) of our language.

"đu quay" is also a compound noun whose each syllable does contribute its own meaning to the whole word. "đu" means "(a) swing/to swing/swinging" while "quay" means "to rotate/rotating". So the compound "đu quay" means "(a) rotating swing".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Maybe you have to pull back and forth in a seesaw motion to get the fruit off of the tree? Okay, a bunch fall down and now I have enough papaya. At least that is what I will picture.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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It's the Memrise method, isn't it? You try to imagine something weird or closely related to the word's meaning and/or pronunciation. In real life, if you do pull back and forth to get pawpaws what you actually get are smashed, broken fruits. Cleaning that mess would properly take you hours.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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I guess I will have to make some kind of preserves with whatever I can salvage! The trick is to tie tablecloths under the tree like hammocks. I hope it isn't worse than the plums in my backyard. Perhaps it would be better to twist them around like a ferris wheel. Look away! Okay, that could be worse.

I better skip the ferris wheel and just twist them gently off. They don't even grow off a real tree, so how will I make the fruit hammocks?

http://homeguides.sfgate.com/papaya-tree-ready-picked-39843.html Okay, apparently I am going to need a knife to cut the fruit off the plant and I don't even know the word for knife yet!

You caught me! I won't be forgetting any of these words anytime soon and yeah, I'll just go to the train station now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

đu đủ is just a case of where Vietnamese loves to reduplicate/alliterate to form new words for animals or plants/fruits. Other examples include: chôm chôm (rambutan) and bòn bon (langsat).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScarletS.

I'm wondering this, too! I'm writing notes as I'm going through questions, and when I got the papaya question, I thought "đu đủ" would be two words, assuming "đủ" might have been a modifier. So I corrected my notes like "oh, okay, both parts together mean 'papaya'", and then immediately got this question next like "..wait what".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tinhde

in vietnam "đu đủ" is a fruits "đu quay" is a game of child. like "swing " in vietnam it means "xích đu" in Vietnam sometimes two words put together have means true. (sorry, because my english is not good)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vortarulo
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Apparently, đu means 'swing, seesaw', and đủ means 'to be enough, sufficient'. But I don't think this is where the word for papaya comes from. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highegoinside

'Đu' (verb): is the action of holding your hand to the fulcrum in order to hang/suspend your body in space. (It's my own definition, not a dictionary and I'm sorry if it doesn't help you understand the problem) For instance: . You do it when you do pull-up exercise, you put your hand on the-thing-I-can't-describe =>Remember that it's the action of your hand (You can search on google words like "đu dây", "đu xà ngang", ... )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
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  • 1506

How exactly is đ supposed to be pronounced?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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/đ/ or its capital form /Đ/ sounds closely to /d/ in Spanish (De naDa, Desayuno) or as a tapping /t/ in American English (buTTer, weDDing). It may be pronounced a little different from one accent to another.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
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/.../ is used for IPA phonemes, Ð is not an IPA character. You meant to use <...> for orthography. Also, you brought up three very different pronunciations: <d> after vowels in Spanish sounds like English <th> in ‘this’, and <t(t)> and <d(d)> between vowels generally sounds like Spanish <r> after vowels.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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Sorry for my bad English. I'm a native Vietnamese and I live in the South of Vietnam. I don't know the right terms to use in my previous comment but yep, I meant <đ>, <Đ> as you spell them.

This part: "sounds closely to /d/ in Spanish (De naDa, Desayuno) or as a tapping /t/ in American English (buTTer, weDDing)." is still true, at least to me, because they can be pronounced a little different from one dialect to another. I also don't think, as you said, <d> after vowels in Spanish sounds like English <th> in ‘this’, especially when you don't have to stick out the tip of your tongue between your front teeth. Cheers!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
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It definitely does. Maybe it doesn’t stick out like in American English but it’s definitely not a plosive.

And your English is great; it’s your knowledge of linguistics that is a bit lacking (like, uh, that of the vast majority of humanity).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/01666983643

The train station, the ferris wheel?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Summer.Breeze
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That's correct. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iainsona
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Wondering if there's a Vietnamese keyboard that I can download that the contributors to this course might recommend? I wrote "nhà ga, đu quay" and, as expected, it gave me "Almost correct."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Highegoinside

Vietnamese usually use Unikey. I found this web http://yourvietnamese.com/vietnamese-language-express-course/learn-to-type-vietnamese/ , which teaches how to type in vietnamese. And a virtual keyboard: http://yourvietnamese.com/vietnamese-tools/online-typepad/ I hope it may help you :>

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

Why do we not need to classify "du quay" here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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You can use the classifiers 'cái, chiếc' for 'đu quay'. But for your convenience, the VN team left the classifiers out to make it easy for you. We don't need to use classifiers all the time. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatieLupine

Railway station is also fine, right? O>O

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oldamar999
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I just want to know. is it common for Vietnamese speakers to say the implosive "đ" (/ɗ/ in ipa) as a normal /d/? i'm doing the implosive to sound accurate, but it takes my breath easily.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatieLupine

Yes, it's common. Tired, huh? :)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Minhpc
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Oh my God!!! Ferris wheel??? No, Ferris is enought.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IIIIOIIII
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It sounds like d when you have the flu. dada dudu.

4 months ago
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