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https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky

Prezidento / prezidanto confusion

ionasky
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I must have missed these on the first run throught the tree but now i am given prezidento and prezidanto as the two options i should have selected. What is the difference between them and why are there two versions? What have i missed?

2 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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Looking on Reta Vortaro, it appears that prezidento is a prezidanto at the country level.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Oh, seems pretty pointless to me, but hey ho, not a pair of words i am going to have much use for. Thanks for the answer

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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If you always use prezidanto, you'll always be correct, which is why we teach that in the course. We, however, want to accept prezidento in case someone uses that instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WahahaDrills
WahahaDrills
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So, does this mean all prezidentoj are prezidantoj, but not all prezidantoj are prezidentoj?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Ah, i thought that is what i had selected but it said i had missed one of the correct answers. No matter i will remember it if it comes up again

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fantomius
Fantomius
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Here's how I tell them apart:

Prezidanto ("prezid-anto") is derived from the root word "prezid-i", which means "to preside." Putting the well-known "-anto" suffix onto "prezid-" creates the word "prezidanto," which means "one who presides" (much like how "esperanto" means "one who hopes").

Prezidento, however, is not derived from a root word (well, arguably it is, but that derivation comes from other languages, and not from Esperanto itself). Its ending "-ento" is not an Esperanto suffix, so it would be incorrect so say it derives from combining "prezid-" and "-ento" (unlike "prezidanto," which is derived from combining "prezid-" and "-anto").

Because prezidento is not derived from a root word, it shouldn't be a surprise that it was brought in from outside of Esperanto to mean something specific. And indeed, it means "president" (or "chairman"), often as an official title.

Prezidanto can also mean "president / chairman" but more along the lines of "one who is (currently) presiding," and not so much as a political position. (So though it still can be used as a political title, it doesn't necessarily mean that.)

I hope this clears things up, ionasky.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benja_Zouras

Dankon!

2 years ago