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  5. "Tôi ghi âm cô ấy."

"Tôi ghi âm ấy."

Translation:I record her.

April 22, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trannosaur

Record like with a video camera? Or record down on paper?

April 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LanguageButcher

âm = sound. So I think she's being taped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jungerstein

Yes. Ghi is 記 (to record, to memorize), and âm is 音 (tone, voice, sound). Vietnamese and Chinese chose different verbs (in Chinese we say 录音 luyin, where 录 also means to record, to register). In Mandarin, the final -m is merged to -n; however, Vietnamese keeps the ancient pronunciation. If one writes poems in ancient Chinese form, one must clearly distinguish -m ending words and -n ending words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heysoos1

What is the relationship between the two languages? Are they actually related or are there a bunch of loan words or what? How well can they understand each other, if at all? Please forgive my ignorance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrederickEason

Vietnamese has many loanwords from Chinese, but the two languages belong to separate language families, Austroasiatic and Sino-Tibetan, respectively. The relationship between these two families is not yet known, so it is currently unknown whether Chinese and Vietnamese have a common ancestor. It would be safe to assume any Sinitic words in Vietnamese are loanwords, as both languages have been separate for a very long time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckhadung

The two languages are related. Before the arrival of European missionaries and the "Latinisation" of Vietnamese language, Vietnamese people used to use Hanzi for a very long time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mu6OVm

But that's because they didn't have a writing system. The languages were different, but as Chinese writing is symbolic, they could use it (still, some modifications on the writing system were necessary, but this I don't understand why)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

<Ghi âm> = to record somebody's voice, <ghi hình/quay phim> = to record somebody on video


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissBunibunbun

How creepy, Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

This is in common phrases? Is that a joke?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckhadung

This sentence is in "Alphabet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpbell

Weird, I wonder if it can appear in more than one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ume_Sama

How do you pronounce "gh"? Is the g silent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

No, /g/ in <gh> is not silent but /h/. <gh> sounds just like <g>. <gh> is used only before <i>, <e> and <ê>. For example: ghi, ghe, ghê, ghim, ghen, ghiền, ghẹo etc. <g> precedes other vowels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeskyTriangle

Stop recording her, stalker.

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