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https://www.duolingo.com/MrGriffindor

How hard is it to get at new course started?

As most grow up swedes I'm mostly fluent in English.

Now I got a preschool (6year) kid that can read in Swedish but want to learn English. Yesterday we did the first few courses reversed (learning Swedish for English speaking people) and it worked fine, she ended up creating the sentence "I is a girl" by her self after using the app 30-40minutes (make perfect sense in Swedish, and more importantly proves that she did not just copied, but actually understood. Anyway I think it would be really easy to use that course to create a course in English for swedes.

As most grownup in Sweden are semi fluent in English, English being mandatory to learn in school from the age of 10 it should not be to hard to get backers of the project as a lot of Swedish parents struggle to help there kids learn English and duolingo could certenly help many of the kids.

But how hard is it to get a new course started here on duolingo?

2 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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Very hard, look at Finnish. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/3377185 So much demand for it but no signs of it being added soon. They've gone very professional and are already working on a tree collaboratively through Facebook so that on the day Duolingo finally decides to add Finnish, it will be finished in record time. https://www.facebook.com/groups/DuolingoFinnish/permalink/504941703024494/

Duolingo also seems to have its attention mostly focused on learners of English in developing countries with poorer education systems and populations who usually struggle with English, the complete opposite of Sweden basically, so it might be a long time until the Scandinavian languages get courses in English. I wish it weren't so, but there are so many languages and relatively so few resources available to Duolingo in terms of the company itself, so they have to pace themselves and choose wisely what courses they want to add.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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It's quite easy if you have skilled people willing to put the time in. The problem is finding them, and that's actually a lot harder in this case than you might think. You need people who are fluent in both English and Swedish, and whose native language is English - since that's the target language. They ideally need some formal linguistics training and they should know how to teach a language. Those requirements are hard to fulfil. I would not, for instance, consider myself for such a course, and my English is quite a lot better than that of the semi-fluent grown-ups you mention.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGriffindor

How many people need to bee in a team, and how many hours i normally needed to get a language started?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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A good number is 5. But I think there's one course being built by a single person at the moment. Some courses have around 10. Building the entire course probably takes around 500 man-hours.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGriffindor

Thanks, there is few things as good to make a estimate as hard numbers :)

I check around if I can raise some help from a Swedish English teacher and a unemployed editor from the English Wikipedia. Most likely it will be hard due to the fact that there is nothing to work on.

I might also check with the team behind English -> Swedish as making a Swedish -> English course should be really easy for them. Actually I assume alot of thing should be reusable from that course ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Just checking, are those people actually native English speakers? Being fluent is simply not enough, I'm afraid.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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I wrote about why we can't have English for Swedish speakers in this topic: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/14892421 – the tl;dr; version is that it's about the user interface: Duo doesn't want to add any new "for" languages for technical reasons. So unless they make some big technical changes to the site, there will be no courses "from" Swedish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGriffindor

Thanks, that explains a things, a bit sad that it's that way but I guess there is nothing to do. If my daughter keep her interest in English for a few more months I guess I could buy her a Rosetta stone account instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airelibre
airelibre
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Do you get English kids' TV in Sweden? That might be worth a try before shelling out on Rosetta Stone, which I personally think is worth only 1/10th of its price.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGriffindor

Yes there is English kids' TV in sweden, and in for instance netflix we can chose to play the most movies/shows in english rather then swedish. The problem is that I'm not sure she want to learn that way, it's a rather focused child and she want to feel that she is learning. Also I was personally unable to pick language that way as a kid, so I think there is a fair chance she have the same handicap. Basically the Rosetta stone/duolingo model is the only thing I have found working for me (Swedish school certainly didn't), and if Rosetta stone is the only existing solution... Well even with the high price, if it manage to learn her English before starting school I think the price is worth it (€238 for a 24month subscription.). After all, knowing English open up so much information, for instance most duolingo courses ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti
Arnauti
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Don't forget to check out what your local library can offer. I have no idea what the difference is between the subscription and the actual DVD:s, but I used to borrow the latter from my library. They may have other courses too, the staff may be able to help you if you ask them.

There are probably also some good smartphone apps. Maybe http://www.pappasappar.se/ can be useful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGriffindor

I will have a look at the library's, she picked up a english book last week and now she reads one page each night to me before going to sleep (I have to translate alot). Anyway I found out that Babel actually support swedish->english so I give her a subscription there to start with. 3month cost ~€20 so it's more reasonable.

Once she master English she can progress with other languages using duolingo.

2 years ago