"Một ly nước, cảm ơn."

Translation:A glass of water, thanks.

2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AnCatDubh
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From Chinese 感恩 gǎn‘ēn (Cantonese gam2 jan1), ‘gratitude’.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eclairevoyant
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Thank you for these posts throughout the course! so much easier to anchor words this way

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k10nn10th
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What's the difference between cảm ơn and cám ơn?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TranVanHaiNam
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Actually, "cám ơn" is an informal variation of "cảm ơn" and it's often used in daily conversations (nationwide, not only in Southern dialect like TehVanach said). However, in formal speech and text, you should use "cảm ơn" instead of "cám ơn". To me, I always use "cảm ơn" even when I talk.
Some Vietnamese words have the same variation, for example: phản ảnh (original) and phản ánh (derived).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

Cám ơn is the Southern Vietnamese spoken form. It arose out of tone sandhi (the process of tone changes due to fast speech). The tones ả and ã in the South have merged and start low and rise to a high pitch.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k10nn10th
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I thought it has to do with formality, no? I also see cảm ơn in formal written writing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

Which is why I said it's the spoken form in Southern Vietnamese although both can be considered formal by Southern speakers. It most likely arose out of tone sandhi.

Edit: It's also because modern written Vietnamese is largely based on Hanoian Vietnamese after they ousted the Southern regime.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jathy5
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No difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennethLam3

I entered thank you instead of thanks and was marked incorrect. Is it really that specific?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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You can hit the REPORT button and suggest your own translation. I see no problem with "thank you" here.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krikori
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What's the difference between a "glass of water" and a "water glass (glass used for drinking water)" I'm guessing there's a grammatical distinction when it comes to purpose?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
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If you mean "a glass of water", you say "một ly nước".

If you mean "a glass used for drinking water", you say "một CÁI ly (dùng để) uống nước".

People who speak the Northern dialect probably say CHIẾC instead of CÁI and CỐC instead of LY/LI.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael775713

In english if you are asking for a glass of water you would say "a glass of water please" . The intention of this phrase counts and even though it has used cam on could be translated as please equally as thanks

8 months ago
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