"Mẫu giáo"

Translation:The kindergarten

April 24, 2016

31 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kilire

I put 'the nursery' and it was incorrect..?

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TehVanarch

They tend to skip a lot of synonyms, unfortunately. Just report it to them for inclusion.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

Does nursery mean kindergarten somewhere in the world? Kindergarten in this case means the institution where children go to start their education and transition from home to school. Didn't know that meant nursery elsewhere. Actually didn't know nursery was used anywhere outside very posh homes, either.

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kilire

Nursery in the UK is a word for a so called 'kindergarden' in the US.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

Just nursery? Thought the school portion was a necessity (as in nursery school).

Sorry for the questions. Am generally always interested in differences in usage between countries that use the same language.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kilire

Oh, I understand now. Sorry, I've always traditionally called it just 'Nursery', the proper way to say it would be 'Nursery school' but British people often shorten it to 'Nursery'. We sometimes also call it play-group or pre-school, which is exactly the same thing.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

In the US, preschool is more intense than nursery school. You could actually be tracing alphabet letters, while nursery school is more about interacting with other children and just singing the alphabet song. Kindergarten is actually now a required part of school in which reading and writing is learned. The curriculum all dropped down one year. So what I learned in 1st grade, they learn now in Kindergarten in California.

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/factor828

I am wondering what the difference is between "mẫu giáo" and "trường mầm non"? Is mẫu giáo an earlier stage of education than mầm non? Or do they have the same meaning but are used in a different way?

May 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

Trường mầm non = trường mẫu giáo = nhà trẻ = nhà giữ trẻ.

Source: https://vi.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nh%C3%A0_tr%E1%BA%BB

June 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.ChrisKing

so which ones are actually used? I only recall seeing mam non in HCMC but that could be because I don't pay that much attention to pre-schools

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

Trường mầm non and trường mẫu giáo are used the most. It really depends whether founders of a pre-school decide which name they want to use for it. Around my place, there are Mầm non HOA SEN (LOTUS) and Mẫu giáo HOA HỒNG (ROSE). Some small private kindergartens use Nhà trẻ for their name: Nhà trẻ KIM HOA (a person's name)

June 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

When I translated the page though, the English versions have different meanings. Nursery school and preschool in the USA is before Kindergarten. Day care provides the least learning although some do provide classes during the day while they take care of the children for people who work. Kindergarten is provided at the school site now and is required in many places. It is the last year before regular school. In California, they now learn to read and write and do arithmetic in Kindergarten when previously that didn't start until the following year. They do so much now that children who have not gone to preschool prior to Kindergarten actually have a hard time.

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

I suspect that "trường mầm non" is a more common in-country usage, so I'm not certain what it means as it pertains to current usage. I can tell you that "mẫu giáo" definitely corresponds to the Western kindergarten, even the ages, though that might be slightly different solely because age sometimes gets counted differently in Vietnam, at least in the old method - am certain this old style isn't the norm anymore but the people who run these schools tend to be of an age where the old method might still be used.

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1663792440

mẫu giáo= trường mầm non, don't diference

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schabranigdo

I have a hard time hearing the difference between mỗ and mẫu. is there a difference? or do I just need to memorize the spelling for this?

May 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

mổ http://forvo.com/word/m%E1%BB%95/#vi

mẫu http://forvo.com/word/m%E1%BA%ABu/#vi

I actually think the mẫu pronunciation isn't terribly good, but it's good enough to serve as a differentiator. The two words should sound different, so it might just be a case of needing to train your ear.

May 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schabranigdo

yeah, see those two recordings are clearly different. I pronounce them like that. Though even talking to various vietnamese here where I live, there seems to be notable variation on how some of the vowels are pronounced. For example, I have heard ngũ pronounced [ngũ] and [ngôũ] where there is a small o or ơ inserted before the vowel. Is this left over from the consonant ngờ ?

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

Yeah, I don't know where the pronunciation you're talking about comes from. The old capital or there-ish, I think? It's definitely a dialect thing, as opposed to just a random odd pronunciation. I pronounce it that way if I'm being particularly obnoxious, but I'm not sure where I picked it from.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schabranigdo

yay for dialect variation.... :P . but i guess that is the same issue that somebody trying to learn english comes across when they meet british, canadian, northern and southern Americans and all those other unique variations they have in the USA.

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

I would pronounce ô as /o/ in Spanish (yo, como) and âu as /oʊ/ in American English (so, though).

June 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schabranigdo

:) that really depends on where in the US that american is from. But you gave phonetics so I can tell what you mean.

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

Sorry if I have confused you because I don't really know how to explain it with my poor English. ; ( You may watch some Youtube videos about how to pronounce Vietnamese consonants and vowels to get the idea. Cheers! ; )

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azureskies

Wiktionary says the words come from the chữ nôm "母教", which I suspect to be a calque of French's "école maternelle".

https://zh.wiktionary.org/wiki/m%E1%BA%ABu_gi%C3%A1o

May 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

<mẫu giáo> means something like mother's nurture/mother's teaching

June 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GnightOwl

Tôi đã đi mẫu giáo

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael775713

Kindergarten is a german word the english spelling is kindergarden

October 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jungerstein

Does Mẫu here mean a not-too-big piece of land?

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

[Edited]

MẨU, not MẪU -> 'a not-too-big piece of land' is 'một (1) MẨU đất'.

MẪU, on the other hand, can have various meanings: http://tratu.coviet.vn/hoc-tieng-anh/tu-dien/lac-viet/V-A/m%E1%BA%ABu.html

  • mẹ: mother -> MẪU GIÁO means something like mother's nurture/mother's teaching.

  • mẫu: hectare -> 10,000 m² (used in the South VN) or 3,600 m² (in in the North VN);

  • mẫu: sample (as in 'blood sample')

  • mẫu (đơn): form (as in 'fill in a form')

June 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

Oh thank goodness someone else spoke up. I remembered it as "mẩu" but looked it up since I always mix the two up and the online dictionary I used told me I was wrong. I need to start referencing the old paper dictionaries again, I guess.

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dd721411

You're welcome! Cheers!

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saturnwings

Just that word alone? Yes.

Edit to add: I looked it up and it apparently translate to an acre, which most people would classify as large, so I guess it's large if an acre is large to you. I think of acre as middling, so there you go.

May 25, 2016
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