"Mộtcáicamộtcáigăngtay"

Translation:A mug and a glove

2 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Sr.Stephen
Sr.Stephen
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Why does it sound like "Một'n" at the beginning?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackat87

I guess there might be a problem with the audio. The "một" at the beginning should sound exactly like the second one. In Vietnamese, spelling and pronunciation go together.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Malcogida

Which should it be then? Mot'n or Mot? I have listened to all of the examples numerous times and concur with Sr. Stephen. It is consistently pronounced as Mot'n at the beginning of sentences.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackat87

It should be without the n. I think it's just a recording problem. If you find it in other examples, maybe you can report it so they can fix it latter. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Malcogida

Thank you!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
dd721411
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The man pronounced the first "một" a little longer than necessary. That made "một" sound just like "một-n" while it should be pronounced like the second "một" in that sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyjo77
skyjo77
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Thank you. That sounds like an inverse pronunciation - một-t(ộm).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thaolu2
thaolu2
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Một=1 .is use with Number but In the sentence they use A

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidbeckwith
davidbeckwith
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Are mugs and gloves particularly popular items of discussion in Vietnam?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

No it's just something they've chosen at random.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchman2014
Dutchman2014
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Language skills: Asian. (Sorry man, I just couldnt help it - 20 languages is truly impressive!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidbeckwith
davidbeckwith
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Hey thanks! :) I will certainly drop some of them along the way. It is fascinating getting a sense of each language's sounds and nuances.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchman2014
Dutchman2014
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Thats true :). And I like the semi playful way of DL. For vocabulary I dont think its the best, for grammar it sure is good. And hey, its for free :D. Only takes some time and effort :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KingDaniel18
KingDaniel18
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Lol

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/utahoshi
utahoshi
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The first and second "cái" sound pronounced differently here, but aren't they the same classifier word? Is there a reason for that?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackat87

They sound the same for me, and they should sound the same. Yes, they are the same classifier word. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Malcogida

Again, like the Mot'n vs Mot situation - cai is alternately pronounced as 'cay' or 'cah' - maybe even 'cuh'. It is a significant difference, but there is no indication as to why or when to use one pronunciation over the other. If there really is just one way to correctly pronounce it, then which is the correct way?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackat87

There's only one way to pronounce it. It is somehow like /kʌɪ/ (like the sound of "I") with the rising tone. You can check the end of this link to find some guidelines with Vietnamese tones.

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/15102767

Have fun learning :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
dd721411
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"cái" can be pronounced differently, depending on the speaker's accent. This speaker uses Northern accent.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VPHAM01

I put a mug and the glove but I got it wrong. Can somebody help?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
dd721411
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You should write "a mug and a glove" instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VPHAM01

Thanks! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Can someone break down ‘cái găng tay’?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
dd721411
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Well, let's say:

-- găng [noun] - glove [noun]

-- tay [noun] - hand, arm [noun]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Thanks; I realized just after I wrote that (but couldn't get back to it) that I knew what ‘cái’ is. But ‘găng tay’ … if ‘găng’ means ‘glove’ already, then can it be used on its own, or should it always be followed ‘tay’? Can it be followed by other words to mean something else?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
dd721411
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Yes. You can use 'găng tay' or just 'găng' for 'glove(s)', 'mitten(s)', 'boxing glove(s)', 'gauntlet(s)' etc. To be more specific, we add more "information" after 'găng (tay)' to show what type of 'glove(s)' we are talking about:

  • glove(s): găng (xỏ ngón), găng tay (xỏ ngón);

  • mitten(s): găng (tay) liền ngón;

  • boxing glove(s): găng (tay) đấm bốc;

  • gauntlet(s): găng (tay) hiệp sĩ/sỹ, găng (tay) bảo hộ

We tend to use 'găng tay' more because it sounds better when you say a word with two or more syllables instead of one. However, nothing can stop you from using just 'găng' :)

Please also keep in mind that 'găng' and 'găng tay' are of Northern dialects. In the South, people use 'bao tay' instead. Never use just 'bao' for 'glove(s)' because 'bao' means 'bag', 'pack', 'packet', 'sack', etc.

In summary:

  • glove(s) - găng, găng tay (Northern dialects)

  • glove(s) - bao tay (Southern dialects)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thegreatbuddha

It means 'a singer and a glove' also, duolingo!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dd721411
dd721411
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'Singer' should be translated as 'ca sỹ/sĩ', not 'ca' or 'cái ca'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Songve

The "n"sound following "một" is not a mistake. It is common in Northern dialect and in songs. However, I cannot find the rule when that sound is made and when not. It was not made with "một bé gái". It seems to be dependent on the following. Help please.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

It's more common when preceding a nasal consonant like m, n, nh or ng.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Songve

Thank you.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tyler747506

Why does the audio sound like the first word một has 2 syllables? This is very confusing for me

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TehVanarch

They're extending the -t which makes it sound like an -n.

8 months ago
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