"Our car leaves on Monday."

Translation:Nasz samochód odjeżdża w poniedziałek.

April 24, 2016

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LICA98

why is it ponedziałek and not ponedzialek?

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

What do you mean? First of all, you ate the "i", it's poniedziałek, and it is written with an Ł, it always is. Although damn, this font used by duolingo makes the difference between l and ł almost invisible :/

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LICA98

so what is the reason for it being written with ł instead of l? I have set the browser to show the text in a custom font whenever possible, so it's easy to see the difference between l and ł

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Good idea. Well, maybe someone who's educated in terms of etymology could give you an answer, but I would just say "this is how the word looks like". I guess you see that it's built as po+niedziela, and it's true that понедельник has ль which would be usually transcribed into Polish as simple L, but the Polish version is just written with an Ł. I can't help you by giving you anything more of a reason.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

It's not only written with "ł", it also sounds like "ł". To a Pole. It may sound different to foreigner who somehow cannot hear "Ł"

also I don;t speak Russian, ut I think there are more cases where Russian word has ль and Polish has ł.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

You ask great questions, it's just you probably need a degree in history of Polish language to know the answers. I assume the same thing happened that changes byli to były and miły to mili.

Or why we have miał from mielić, and działka from dzielić.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

I tried different thing:

this page saerches for the Polish words that end certain way: http://www.zakonczone.pl/na/ałek there are 85 words with -ałek, out of which I counted 15 masculine nouns in nominative

and 47 words ending alek, out of which there are 2 masculine nouns in nominative

(most other words are feminine plural in genitive. most -ałek words seem older and less foreign)

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LICA98

well I think it's probably because "łi" doesn't exist (or at least I haven't seen any words that have "łi"?) image

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mihxal

Yes, except the word "weekend". But generally, in Polish soft consonants connect with "i" and hard consonants connect with "y". "L" is treated as a soft consonant, whereas "Ł" is treated as a hard consonant.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LICA98

where is there a "łi" in "weekend"...?

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mihxal

At the beginning - it is pronounced as "łikend".

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

I can't remember one , but we are going to have a few in a future, when we start writing łikend like we should :)

I think old ł that dissapeared in XX century could not be followed by i.

but my point is we also have verb działać - that comes from the same verb that niedziela- and here we also we have "ł".

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LICA98

those are not exactly the same though, if you compare to Russian then działać=делать and niedziela=неделя (the Russian words have a different meaning but it doesn't really matter here)

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

It's kinda funny that a word derived from ne dělati (nie pracować) means only a Sunday in Polish, but a whole week in Russian :D

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

Well I don't know Russian. I found etymology on wiktionary for niedziela and for działać on WSJP.pl

niedziela prasł. * nedělja, od * ne dělati (nie pracować)

działać psł. * dělati 'stawiać, budować; robić, pracować; być czynnym'

My point is that I don't know why those things happened in Polish and did not happen in Russian and I tried to find an answer, but as I said I don't have any education in this field and I can't find anything on the internet.

April 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LICA98

as you wrote: "niedziela prasł. * nedělja, od * ne dělati (nie pracować)" – the first one has lj (soft) and the second one just l (hard)

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

can i say swój samochód odjeżdża poniedziałek

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

No. Firstly, you left out the "w" in "w poniedziałek", but most importantly, "swój" doesn't make any sense here.

"Marek myje swój samochód" = "Marek washes his (his own) car". Marek is a subject of the sentence and the car belongs to Marek.

"Swój samochód" here would mean that the car... belongs to itself? The car's car... that does not make any sense in this sentence, as the car is the subject here.

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

thank you

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluthbanana87

Why is it sometimes 'w' and sometimes 'o ?

April 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

You'd have to specify the question, because I don't know what you're referring to. It definitely is "w poniedziałek".

Unless this "o" is about the hours: 'odjeżdża o siódmej".

April 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluthbanana87

Shoot, I'll try to make note of when I see 'o' and when I see 'w' the next time I run through these exercises. But I've noticed that sometimes it's 'w xxxx' and sometimes it's 'o xxxx' (not specifically in regards to 'w poniedziałek'). Is there a convention for that?

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I still need more context to know what to compare. Apart from what I wrote already :)

April 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajan06

Ł is a polish letter and doesn't exist on other languages. The letter should be spoken like english w in wind woman window. L is just L. Spoken like english lamp lion look.

January 16, 2019
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