https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

many nonsense sentences

LICA98
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why are there so many nonsense sentence in the course (like "she is the man", "eat a mug" etc.)? why couldn't they just put normal sentences like "she is a girl", "I'm reading the newspaper" like most of the other courses do?

2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/germanwannabee

It's so people don't just memorize the sentences to use, without really understanding them. It's like that so people learn how to make their own normal sentences. Also when you have a weird phrase, you memorize the word better, because you associate it with a sentence that stands out. Also, who doesn't want a good laugh now and then :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

There is a difference between weird sentences and nonsense sentences. I'm in full support of weird sentences, but totally against nonsense sentences. It often adds more confusion for beginners.

There was one sentence that says I love your scarf, which is normal, but it uses the word "love" that only applies to people. Their argument is that they just try to teach the word. To me, that's just wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JensBu
JensBuPlus
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She is a man. Actually that's a phrase used in English, German and other languages. It means she is the one (in the family) who makes the decision (woman decides and the man does not).

I don't know about that particular case in Vietnamese but very often different words are used in another language. Especially more distant language. Word by word translations help to understand. In for example Finnish you eat medicine, you open the tv and you close the lights off.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

Do you mean "she's the man"? "She's a man" is a whole different story.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knoxienne
Knoxienne
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I think (please correct me if I'm in error) that the purpose of the "eat a mug" and such phrases is to help the student distinguish between other similar or same spelled words that have different accents. It comes out nonsensical, of course, but so do a lot of our English mnemonics, tongue-twisters, etc. We're just used to ours. As far as other weird sentences, give the team time to iron out a lot of the kinks and improve the sentences during the beta stage. Aside from the fact that I have always enjoyed the Vietnamese language, I've found a lot of the more advanced sentences to be some of the most refreshing and edifying that I've seen here on Duolingo. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
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Yep, you don't want to be telling people in Vietnam that you eat mugs (ca) when you meant fish (cá) ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cazort
cazort
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This is a good point, that there are plenty of nonsense rhymes and sentences taught to kids, probably for a similar purpose.

It's good to hear too that when you get into the more advanced material, that the sentences seem to be designed in a really useful or helpful way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/germanwannabee

I must say 'eat a mug' is pretty random :) but that was in the alphabet skill, so it could be that 'eat a mug' had many of the new sounds they were trying to teach you. Maybe 'I'm reading a newspaper' had sounds that you already knew, so, when used in this context, 'eat a mug' was in fact, teaching you better.

I'm also quite confident that you will come across useful sentences in duolingo,

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WahahaDrills
WahahaDrills
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Like I've pointed out before, crazy sentences are a great way to teach a language. Giving more memorable sentences rather than mundane ones makes it stick. Before, I used "nonsense" which wasn't the best word choice.
At least, it's a bonus, but I realize the other reasons mentioned are probably the primary reasons the course creators made the choices they did.

"Eat a mug" is definitely something that stands out over "thank you."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aistobe
aistobe
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If the sentences were normal, how would you know if you were getting it based on context or if you really understood it. If the sentences are absurd and you get them right, then you should be able to get "normal" ones right too. Or maybe even be able to read science fiction/fantasy in your target language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
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How have you done so many languages and just now noticed the nonsense sentences?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
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In addition to what else was already said, funny sentences are great to entertain/impress native speakers with. Whenever I meet Dutch people, I always tell them "de vogels lezen de krant" :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrK_Ct
MrK_Ct
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By using these nonsense sentences you will focus on the words and their use in the sentence. This prevents students of only learning sentences by heart.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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no it doesn't

2 years ago
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