"Il a deux pieds gauches !"

Translation:He has two left feet!

April 25, 2016

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoM0

But indeed it is an idiom, it is used here in Colombia to describe people who can not dance very well.

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PJMCD

In England as well.

October 1, 2016

[deactivated user]

    Philippines has this, too. I guess it's a known idiom worldwide?

    June 5, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

    Let's just keep adding to the list, and see. I can confirm for Italy. Lui ha due piedi sinistri.

    November 23, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArpsTnd

    True, I was once said to have "parehong kaliwâ ang paa" lols.

    December 29, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

    Is this idiom also used commonly in French? Or are we just getting a direct rendering of the English?

    June 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

    The French sentences that you can find in the lessons were written by French people. Sometimes, there is a direct rendering into English and it's easier for learners. We tend to favor these cases but since French is not a translation of English nor vice-versa, it can be tougher with idioms.

    June 5, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TechnoBlack

    This is good because it is an idiom that back translates to English seamlessly, unlike the ones that don't, which are in their own idiom section.

    October 9, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

    These idioms are so insulting to lefties. We never say that someone has "two right feet." :)

    June 24, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
    • 1805

    Idioms reflect the world we live in. The use of the right and the left has been used this way by people all over the world for thousands of years. Besides, this is not speaking about being left-handed. As referring to someone who doesn't dance well, this expression really took off in the 1920's. No surprise there.

    October 10, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobTheTriangle

    Well this can't be insulting to people who are ambiguous!

    November 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

    ambidextrous

    November 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChickenRunner02

    ambisinistrous

    September 2, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan734508

    must have been typing with two left hands!

    November 20, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osunsina

    I love the word! Have a lingot or five.

    August 9, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobTheTriangle

    oops hehe

    November 28, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shirlgirl007

    I like ambiguous better...

    November 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasGabr13

    If left-footed people had two left feet, they would still do things awkwardly.

    June 20, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenHueb

    I can't help but laugh at the fact that "gauche" as an English word means "lacking social experience or grace" - https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gauche

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

    The world has been so awful to left-handed people. We not only have gauche, but then there is "sinister," which is another word for left-handed that has negative connotations.

    May 10, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan734508

    I bet that was written by a right-handed person

    May 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeaWolven

    It stems from long ago when people thought it was a bad sign and stuff when someone was left-handed, since 90% of people are right-handed. (Mabey it's just me, but I never notice when someone's using their left hand. That just goes to show how observant our ancestors were.)

    August 15, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WaterPolyglot

    I'm hoping this is an idiom?

    January 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

    English has the same idiom. It means he is a clumsy dancer.

    January 29, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kubi119759

    In Dutch it is "two left hands" for people who are clumsy. Does French have that too?

    November 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

    Yes, French has that too.

    November 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fredobedo77

    Ah le pauvre, il est obligé d'acheter de paires de chaussures...

    February 1, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ddesgagne

    In all likelihood this sentence is referring to a quadruped -- some type of animal that does in fact have two left feet.

    April 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KolonelSpons

    Actually, it's an idiom (in both languages) meaning the person is clumsy and not very good at walking or running.

    April 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

    or -especially- dancing!

    April 26, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ddesgagne

    Oh, interesting. Thanks for sharing. ;)

    April 25, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheila386395

    In England it is only used as an idiom - can't dance

    June 15, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

    ... or is always tripping himself up. ☺

    December 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pambot

    Ha, ha

    April 1, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

    Where are you getting that info? Doesn't “quadraped” just mean any four-legged animal in general?

    December 21, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qiset1

    being left footed per my karate instructor, I resent this phrase!

    March 8, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shiningwizard16

    I'm not gonna teach him how to dance with you!

    November 17, 2018
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