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  5. "Kann ich dich anrufen?"

"Kann ich dich anrufen?"

Translation:Can I call you?

January 17, 2014

93 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssurprize

Ja, du kannst, aber du darfst nicht!

January 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanguine.PDX

Oh. Jetzt bin ich traurig...

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zavatt

does it matter if I say

Jetzt bin ich traurig or Jetzt ich bin trautig ?

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yes it does. The verb in a German sentence generally comes in position 2 and if you start the sentence with Jetzt you do have to reverse the subject and verb. It is a somewhat more emphatic way of saying it in German to put the Jetzt in first position. The less emphatic way would be Ich bin jetzt traurig.

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zavatt

Do you mean "more emphatic" as in more emphasis in the sadness? So if it is another expression like "i am now happy" it's more emphasis on the hapiness "Jetzt bin ich glücklich"?

November 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

No. I meant more emphasis on the Jetzt. NOW I am sad, or NOW I am happy. Normally time expressions go directly after the verb, so moving it to first position emphasizes it.

https://german.stackexchange.com/questions/20265/where-can-i-place-the-word-jetzt-in-a-sentence

November 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Yes. The verb generally comes in position two, and if you put Jetzt in position 1 you do have to reverse the subject and verb. Putting jetzt first emphasizes it a little. Ich bin jetzt traurig would not put any emphasis on jetzt.

November 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSaphir

Yes, you can, but you may not!

December 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmartinyoung

Do native German speakers blur the meaning of kann and darf as modern English speakers (and teachers, too, apparently) conflate can and may?

February 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GAURAVSHAR528047

Nett

March 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mptmpt

:)

April 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhoenixRod

It should accept "Can I hallah atcha?"

April 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J_Random_Hacker

Nothing and no one should ever accept this.

August 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

*holla

August 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmniGlot2000

Im sorry what does this mean?

May 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Electricbeach

Can I call you is what it means.

May 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lachym15

Absolutely.

August 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnCoughlan

Actually it should be "may I" as can is to be able to- may is to give permission. Can I only implies the ability to do it- you can call me you can also jump off the roof

April 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tubaace

No, "darf ich" would be asking for permission just like "may I".

April 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay2y05

Like this, can you marry me, she could or could not, or like this, may I come over, where it would be asking.

December 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/valexite

No, grammar and the languages have evolved. Using both of them is acceptable. If you're a teacher, you probably hear "Can I go to the bathroom?" everyday. That isn't wrong!

In fact, I prefer 'can' in less formal situations.

March 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fokstrot

What is the difference between rufen and anrufen? Is there a sentence in which one can be used, but not the other?

March 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssurprize

anrufen is call on the phone. rufen is just call.

Example: Dinner's ready. I call my brother (to eat). :: Ich rufe meinen Bruder. (rufen)

My brother lives in another city. I call him on the phone. :: Ich rufe meinen Bruder an. (anrufen, with separable prefix)

March 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J_Random_Hacker

Are you a native German speaker? Just want to check before I commit this seemingly sensible rule to memory!

August 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

German has many of these separable verbs. They are essentially verb preposition combinations. You might consider that anrufen was call up. In English we have many of these verb preposition phrases which alter the meaning of the verb. Consider the verb to stand. You can stand up, stand down, stand in, stand out, stand for, stand with, stand around, etc. In German these often become separatable verbs. Sometimes the meaning is somewhat obvious to us and sometimes not. Ziehen is to draw or to pull, anziehen is to put on (as in clothing). Kaufen is to buy, but einkaufen is shopping. The later is not as easy to understand.

January 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/af056

Yeah, I thought it should be 'darf' in German, even though 'can i' is more usual in English

February 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimberlytylr

I agree, we use 'can' for a lot of things in English, but darf seems like it would make more sense in German.

February 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnaSrsh

Is "darf" (to be allowed) a more polite way of asking this than using "kann"?

February 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tubaace

darf : may :: kann : can

April 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thelotusflower

Why is "ich" and "dich" in the middle of the sentence? Is it because verbs in German are always at the end of the sentence?

April 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jessibeat

And whenever you're asking a question, the verb moves to the first position

August 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

Not always, but in the infinitive, yes. That's why "anrufen" comes at the end (but not "kann").

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tessa810

A German friend warned me not to use "anrufen," especially "Ruf mich an" because it has an association with the phone sex industry. Is there any validity to this?

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/utsav1522

Is Kann ich anrufen dich wrong? Somebody please explain. Looks like i have still not understood how to order sentences in German

August 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssurprize

Just remember that the second verb, the one that is in the infitive, is always at the end of the sentence.

August 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osama.shal

I want to say can I call you "later" ?

July 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssurprize

I think it's "kann ich dich später anrufen?"

July 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanteTami

ich würde ja zu gerne mal wissen, wer dieses Flirtgedöns hier reingestellt hat. Bei den meisten Sätzen würde ich jedenfalls sofort die Flucht ergreifen...

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Private_606

why is there the ending anrufEN, not anruft?

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ssurprize

it's in the infinitive because of the verb können (kann).

March 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

How do you know when to use "dich" for you instead of "du" or "ihr".

September 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rainbowsnthings

"Dich" is used when ''you" is the object (I call you) "Du" is used when "you" is the subject (You call me) "Ihr" is like y'all :)

September 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyonKhan1

There are several forms of "you" in German. These are the nominative forms of all the you's in German:

(formal) you with respect = "Sie" (capitalized) e.g. Sie haben viel Geld (trans. "You, sir are loaded with dough")

(formal) "you all" or "y'all" with respect = "Sie" (capitalized) e.g. Sie sind reich (trans. "You, sirs are loaded with dough")

(informal) you (just you) = "du" e.g. du isst zu viel (trans. "you eat too much")

(informal) "you all" or "y'all" (just "you all" or "y'all") = ihr e.g. Ihr isst zu viel (trans. "y'all eat too much")

In English we have one word "you" to mean all of them.

This is made even more confusing by the fact that "sie" is also used for "she" and "they" and "ihr" is also used for other cases of "she and they"...

So how do you know which is which?

You really have to look at the verb conjugations that come with the pronoun.

Sorry for the rant, I am pissed because I had been to the fish market and couldn't find the fish I was looking for.

Ich koennte nicht meinen Fisch finden! :(

Salam/Shalom/Namaste/God Bless "Sie"

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

You have a critical error in your comment. In German the word Sie for you is both singular and plural with the same conjugation. Sie hat viel Geld Can ONLY mean She has a lot of money whether or not you capitalize it. The capitalization distinction is between sie sind for they are and Sie sind for you are. English, as a Germanic language, originally had Thou as the equivalent of du and you as both formal singular and plural for both.

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyonKhan1

Right you are, mein Freund. Hab ein Lingot! This is what happens when I do not get my fishies + lack of Schlaf :) Also, error korrekted :)

Thou art right. I will admit, reading old English from Shakespeare (or did I read it from the Bible?) helped a little with learning German...

March 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

Haha, thanks for the answer. A few years too late, but still appreciated. ;)

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maus

Why is saying 'can I ring you up' incorrect?

January 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thornsbreak

that's really not incorrect, it's just a more British way of saying the same thing. In America, that sounds more like something a grocery clerk would ask you-- to "ring up" usually means scanning items at a cash register to find out the total. "ring you up" or "give you a ring" is a very informal, almost slang way of saying "call you", and "ring you up" is very uncommon in modern American English

September 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gstfrr

Anrufen is separable? Ich rufe dich an?

January 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bananenschalen

So listen...Can I get yo numbah?

May 8, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaronloch

Is this in the same use as: "can i call you mine"? Or is anrufen a verb?

July 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Electricbeach

Nope. Anrufen means to call like via a phone. If you used rufen, in the sentence "can I call you mine" I believe that would work. Rufen means to call out, like when talking in the same room or something.

July 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bananenschalen

I'm not sure that's right either. To call out would be like "I call (out [for help/something]) but there is no response." You want a term that means something along the lines of "label", "refer to (as)", or "designate". I would use nennen: „Kann ich dich ‚Meins' nennen?“

But I would need a native speaker's opinion....unless Electricbeach is a native speaker in which case I'm a dingus.

July 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Electricbeach

I am not a native, my answer was based on the translation of the words where anrufen meant to call via phone and rufen was to call out. Another search shows that nennen is also a correct word. This might be a case where a few words can mean the same thing but each are used to be more specific if needed. Kinda like warum, wofür and wieso for "why"

July 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bananenschalen

I think this is more the case where a few words translate to the same English word which has multiple uses. I still wouldn't use rufen, but there are other terms that seem to be similar to nennen. However if you google the phrase I used, it comes back with multiple results in German including e-greeting card graphics and a Facebook page, which leads me to believe it is at least one of the common ways to say what jaronloch wants to say.

July 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OsamaMadan

Why is "dich" before the verb

August 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexkegel

The last sentence was "Ich mag Dich." That escalated quickly.

October 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessie494710

du benutzt nach mich am mein handy

November 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MajdHallak

Can i say , Kann ich dich küssen? Instead of "darf"?

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Electricbeach

Yes. Kann is "can" and darf is "may I"

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam_955

You can call but that doesnt mean ill answer :P

March 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FearsomeElf

You can!She probably won't respond thought,you creepy weirdo!

May 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gerritboehringer

indeed

May 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adhit1412

How do you say "Can you call me?" Is it "Kann dich ich anrufen?"

July 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

No. You have to watch your cases, although in this case it is more a simple issue of subject and direct object pronouns which are present in languages with a much less inflected case system. Ich and Du are subject pronouns and Mich and Dich are direct object pronouns. The formula for this sentence is [können conjugated for subject pronoun] [subject pronoun] [direct object pronoun] anrufen. So can you call me becomes Kannst du mich anrufen. Can we call him is Können wir ihn anrufen, etc

July 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adhit1412

Thanks!

July 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saaraah8

Ich ,dich i cant stop laughing;-)

November 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/g-mann

Whatever you call me,do not call me late for dinner! ;)

December 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CygaGamer

Why are "ich" and "dich" not capitalized? At the beginning it told us that all nouns should be capitalized. "I" and "you" are nouns "person". So why aren't these capitalized?

March 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

Ich and dich are pronouns and pronouns are not capitalized except for Sie when it means you as opposed to she or they.

March 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glooth

can i call to you ? Why wrong

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The verb to call does not use the preposition to when you are talking about phoning. If someone says they called to someone it means that they shouted their name across a room or the like. If you are talking about phoning, you call someone or you can MAKE a call TO someone. English is a strange language.

March 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanteTami

Obse dat kannz , weißich nich, aba dürfn darfse!

March 27, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanteTami

:-) Allright, it's written in a muffled way. I'll translate it to high german (as far as possible): "Ob du das kannst, weiß ich nicht, aber dürfen darfst du!" (I don't know whether you can call me but you are allowed to be allowed to - it's nothing you can really translate but at least where I come from a common phrase)

March 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

Oh, that makes much more sense, haha.

March 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyonKhan1

lol the "dürfen darfst du" part had my mind going in loops like spaghetti

March 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyonKhan1

lol what is that, a dialect? es tut mir leid. Ich habe es nicht verstanden.

March 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaurDL

That was my guess, only part I could make out was "Weiß ich nicht, aber dürfen darf" but heck if I know what the first part could be.

:s

March 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chetalanel

If any of you want to see a hilarious 80's film about this subject, type "The Phone Call" into Youtube

April 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thatguy94

why isn't it Kann ich anrufen dich?

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgentWaffles4

I think so

March 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgentWaffles4

Yes - its possible

March 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/g-mann

What do you want to call me?

May 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

That would be a different call. Anrufen is specifically telephoning someone. When you are talking about what you should call another person, you would generally use the verb ansprechen, to address. Wie spreche ich Sie an. What do I call you/ How do I address you.

May 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmaraSwark

Ja, meine number ist... wie ist deine Telefonnummer?

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomgoonery

Why do all the Rs sound silent on this app? I asked my German friend and she says the Rs aren't silence.

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The German r is never silent. It has, however, two different sounds and is spoken at a different part of the mouth than in English. The r in anrufen is the trilled r at the back of the throat, called an uvular r. The other r is when it comes at the end of a syllable or before a consonant. That has a reduced a sound. It's sort of like how gangster gets pronounced gangsta.

https://www.fluentu.com/blog/german/german-pronunciation-tips-sounds/

https://youtu.be/kqQ4gxcHPDw

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadia.izz

Does it mean the same for call someone name and call by mobile phone?

June 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lynettemcw

The rufen part is call, but it exists as rufen to call or shout outloud, Anrufen to call up or telephone, and aufrufen to call out.

June 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadia.izz

Danke

June 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ally.ml

Lehrer be like: „iCh WeIß nIcHt, oB dU dAs kAnNsT“

November 4, 2019
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