"Mae hi'n niwlog iawn."

Translation:It is very foggy.

4/26/2016, 3:50:53 PM

8 Comments


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Niwlog comes from niwl ("mist; fog; haze"), which is a loanword either from Vulgar Latin *nībulus, a modification of nūbilus ("cloudy"), or from Proto-Germanic *nebulaz ("cloud, mist"), both of them ultimately coming from Proto-Indo-European *nébʰos ("cloud; mist"). In Spanish we call the fog niebla, or its diminutive, neblina, which are also related. (Our word for "cloud" also belongs to the same etymological branch: nube, just like the English astronomical term nebula.)

5/10/2018, 2:36:06 PM

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I believe that "It's foggy out" should be accepted and "out" (meaning outside) could be added to all these sentences to become a more spoken translation of these weather phrases (at least where I come from in the U.S.A.)

4/26/2016, 3:50:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
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It's foggy out wouldn't be an acceptable translation for this sentence since it doesn't include "tu allan", i.e this sentence translates to "It is very foggy". Now if the sentence were "Mae hi'n niwlog iawn tu allan" then "It is very foggy out" could be considered a translation.

4/26/2016, 4:10:45 PM

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But doesn't the sentence imply "outside" (where the weather takes place)..?. This is how we say it in my part of the U.S. "It's foggy out." Otherwise foggy could be taken metaphorically -- It's foggy (the idea is unclear).. If you aren't adding context in Welsh I believe the translation I suggested is perfectly suitable

4/26/2016, 4:31:26 PM

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I'd be happy to consider this if you could give a concrete example of its use, maybe by posting to the facebook group.

4/26/2016, 6:02:16 PM

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It is very common, at least in the Midwest (US) to add "out" when talking about the weather if you're using an adjective (sunny, foggy, etc). When we use a verb (raining, snowing, etc), we add "outside". So, in response to "What's the weather today?" we might say "It's sunny out" or "It's raining outside"

Can you post a link to the facebook group page? I can only find a page for the duolingo app . . .

5/14/2016, 9:25:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
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See the reason I wouldn't use "out" in a translation of this sentence is because in Welsh we might also add something to show that we specifically mean outside i.e as I said before "tu allan" (or "tu mas" if were using the south walian version), as opposed to somewhere else, therefore since this Welsh sentence doesn't include anything that alludes to "out" I wouldn't include one in the translation. Some might say that it's just being picky, but in my German exams I would lose a mark if I'd written a translation with an answer which wasn't fully in the original piece.

4/26/2016, 6:46:15 PM

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Fair enough, EllisVaughn. I was just making a suggestion, because It is cold/foggy/nice (especially nice because it's so ambiguous) is almost always accompanied by "out" or "outside" in conversation here when it means weather. Often this is the criteria for translation, not the literal word-for-word meaning in the original language. However I'm not sure if Welsh has a different phrase for "It's cold" (outside) and "It's cold" (the dinner is cold, for ex.). If they are different than I am wrong. If it's the same sentence, then w/o context I still believe my translation would be correct.

4/26/2016, 6:58:43 PM
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