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"Loro fanno il gelato con una macchina industriale."

Translation:They make the ice cream with an industrial machine.

January 17, 2014

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sapolion

Am I the only one that keeps on failing to translate gelato to ice cream. It seems that I live in a town were there are just as many people selling gelato as ice cream, so I have started thinking of gelato as an English word.Oy!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont
  • 163

The tricky thing is that "gelato" actually is an English word now, but it doesn't have the same meaning as "gelato" in Italian. In Italian it means "ice cream" (of any type), whereas in English it specifically means "fancy hand-made Italian-style artisanal ice cream". I suspect that the sentence is trying to emphasize that point :-).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/super_moi

It is actually the same thing than "panini", which refers to a fancy grilled italian sandwich in English, but actually is the plural of any sandwich in italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Francesca12991

I SO agree! When I say gelato I mean gelato! When I say ice-cream I mean ice-cream! They are not the same, and DL should realize that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lily866813

Yep. I'm right there with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LlamaNation01

An Industrial car #facepalm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jakster

Duolingo should accept gelato as an english word.

I honestly think they're two different products. Gelato is denser, has less incorporated air, less fat and is served at a different temperature than the ice cream you might find in ice creameries outside of Italy (well at least where I live and in my experience in the USA as well).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pont
  • 163

If they're two different products, Duolingo shouldn't accept "gelato" (Italian) as a translation of "gelato" (English). As you say, in English it means a particular variant of ice cream with particular properties (less air, etc.), whereas in Italian it just means ice cream in general. If you wanted to translate the English "gelato" into Italian, you'd have to say something like "gelato artigianale".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitesse2

In this context, commercial would more likely be used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinHawk4

They make ice cream with an industrial machine rejected. I don't understand why. In previous examples the definite article has been omitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iangow

Google Translate turns "They make ice cream with an industrial machine" into "Loro fanno il gelato con una macchina industriale" (that is, the "il" is added). I suspect that the English without a definite is a valid translation (unless the context suggests otherwise).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

Gelato has less fat, less sugar, and more real flavor than "ice cream." They're not the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margarita452780

the word "cream" was not in the answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyT587622

there isnt "an" in the given vocabulary to choose from... hence I always get the wrong answer on this question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hilpertf

As an Aussie, I used "gelato" because that's what I know gelato as. Ice cream is something different. And I got pinged! (cue sad face)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T5lUVGiA

INDUSTRIAL MACHINE


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria663176

Gelato is not ice cream


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregoriusvii

There is no hint of industrial in this sentence Please correst


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gigi563443

Does anybody know why "industrial equipment" is not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yvonne544327

I translated like the answere but it signed wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VerenaBerg6

I wrote industrial machine and it was exepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoteGabric

Insted of make, you can use prepare too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f2dwZQJg

Gelato IS regularly used in the US now, when a place sells gelato, which is creamier and softer than typical American ice cream. In my neighborhood there are 2 places that are gelato places, and 2 that are ice cream places (and then some pinkberries, but let's not go into that...) So I think if the only "mistake" is someone says "gelato" instead of "ice cream" it should be marked correct.

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