1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Portuguese
  4. >
  5. "Ele gosta de chá, no entanto…

"Ele gosta de chá, no entanto, ele não gosta de café."

Translation:He likes tea, however, he does not like coffee.

January 17, 2014

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bread1

is the 'no' nessecary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

it is the translation for however (no entanto).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jun-Dai

These "no entanto" translations are a bit awkard and I think grammatically incorrect. As it stands, it is a run-on sentence. It should either be broken into two sentences (e.g., "He likes tea. He does not like coffee, however.") or "however" should be swapped with a conjunction (e.g., "He likes tea, but he does not like coffee").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itswarmerinmiami

In English we'd just say he likes tea but not coffee. However suggests that although we might expect a tea drinker to like coffee, he doesn't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/the_orange

That's what the Portuguese phrase implies doesn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrooklynNellie

I think that in natural conversation people would say "mas" instead of "no entanto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cacathrib

Is "entanto" more formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/florelormo

can you say "pero" instead of nao intento?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrooklynNellie

It does appear to be a Portuguese word (http://www.priberam.pt/dlpo/pero), but I've never heard it used. Sounds Spanish to my ear. If you want to say "however", "mas" will do.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/florelormo

Thank you, I also speak Spanish and I do get the two languages a little confused sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asafwr

Such long sentences are great, there should be more long abd complex sentences kike this one

Learn Portuguese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.
Get started