"A gente tem conversado bastante."

Translation:We have been talking a lot.

January 24, 2013

23 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gpriddy

Why can't "a gente" be "the people"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrasilGIlyeah

it can but I was just in Rio and a gente is used constantly (as "we").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Yes, it doens't mean "the people".

We would say "o povo", "as pessoas".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UserBob

Only if is "a gente brasileira", but if is "a gente" are us.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

Yes, in most other cases, with complements or different words, "gente" will mean "people". But "a gente" alone will mean "we/us".

It happens also in contractoins: "da gente = nosso = ours".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathan.j5

Related to this, should "People have talked a lot" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saschambaer

Since 'a gente' is only used as 'we', no.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreaparker

why is 'enough' not acceptable here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langdabbler

'Enough' would translate as 'o bastante/suficiente'; 'bastante' alone after a verb means 'a lot'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

Cool. thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cullitrel

Oh, thank you! Obrigada bastante.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wwhoyt

Since "a gente" is we, shouldn't ter be conjugated as temos?


[deactivated user]

    "A gente" is used to avoid having to conjugate the first person plural. One less verb ending to use.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlung1

    I have read that explanation before, however it seems to me that native speakers would have no problem conjugating the verbs. Us foreigners would have that problem, but we're not the ones that establish the usage of words in Portuguese.


    [deactivated user]

      We foreigners would...

      And if there is an easier way to say things, people usually do - which is why you won't find many Brazilians using the conditional tense (imperfeito is easier), and you won't find Brazilians using the future perfect, past perfect or the simple future - it's more difficult to pronounce. Who wants to say "eu quererei" when you can say "(eu) vou querer"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

      Yep....souns like that.

      We only have problems with "tu" and "vós". But we choose the easy path to walk on :p


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller

      Yes, "me dá" is just so easy!

      Dá-me (tu - correct) is weird
      Dê-me (você - correct) less weird but weird too
      Dai-me (vós - correct) common only in the idiom "dai-me forças/paciência (asking God for strenght/patience).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScarlettK1

      I think is something like "one can go crazy" and I am referring to myself...right?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UserBob

      The tongue is alive. "Vós que quereis aprender a língua portuguesa" - I never heard this. Only in the school. But it is not natural. Vós heis de suplicar entender este cidadão. Don't worry. This is the portuguese to the past.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/heitorgiuliani

      The case "nós-a gente" is like "tu-você-


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evelyn637369

      Speaking often was marked wrong - it means the same thing.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnarHolm

      When to use tem and when têm ?


      [deactivated user]

        A gente/ele/ela tem
        Eles/eles têm

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