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"La kato mortigis la muson."

Translation:The cat killed the mouse.

2 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheDidact
TheDidact
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If you switch the last n from the muson to katon something even more graphic happened

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Tom and Jerry?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koojilefet
koojilefet
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but. but! weren't they kissing just a few lessons ago???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Remember, mama cat punished the kitten for kissing the mouse.

RIP Mickey…

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/koojilefet
koojilefet
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mothers...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cambarellus
Cambarellus
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The mouse kissed the ferret and the cat got jealous.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NotWaje

I want to make sure I understand the ig/iĝ aferon, Morti = to die Mortigi = to kill Mortiĝi = to get killed Is this correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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That is a generally workable plan.
li mortis = he died
ŝi mortigis la vesperton = she killed the bat
ili falis el deklivo kaj mortiĝis = they fell off a cliff and were killed.

Note also that only mortigi takes an object (is transitive)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ToLearnForever
ToLearnForever
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I know this may come in a later lesson, but is the -igx affix the equivalent of verbs in English in the passive voice? For 'mortigxis', you translated 'were killed'. I think this is passive voice. Is there another way of forming those verbs in Esperanto? If so, what is the difference between -igx and the passive voice then?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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Morti kaj mortigxi estas samaj

Literally "to die" and "to become dead"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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Not quite the same. You can die without being killed. Being killed implies there was something (other than old age) that specifically killed you.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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Exactly my point. Mortiĝi is defined by PIV as "iĝi morta". Not as "iĝi moritiga".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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So how would you distinguish between 'was killed' and 'died' in Esperanto then?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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If I had to I would use something like "Li iĝis mortiga". Maybe even "Li mortigiĝis" although it would be strange to hear, it would likely be understood.

However, I would think that it would be superfluous as context would usually generate this information and usually in a more specific way than exclusion of natural cause.

"Li mortis." "Ho ne! Kiel li mortis?" "Ŝtelisto mortigis lin."

"Li mortis." "Ho ne! Kiel li mortis?" "Lin batis aŭto."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I got my info on this (mortiĝi) from books like Richardson's Lernolibro and Being Colloquial in Esperanto. There was also a long and very concise discussion on another thread here (over a year ago) which covered every nuance of this root, you could say we talked it to death.

Before that discussion, I too, felt as you do about mortiĝi, since then I've softened my stance. I'm not entirely happy with the word, but I can see logic and merit in it. And, it is being used "on the street," so this seems to be yet another example of how language changes every time someone uses it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Every other language I know, except English, has a K for the initial letter of Cat. You have some idea how much this confuses me. (I don't claim to know French.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ariaflame
AriaflamePlus
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Italian 'gatto', french 'chat',

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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You might note that I didn't say "know of". I'm talking about speaking. I know that Spanish is gato, but I don't really speak Spanish, I know that French is chat, but I don't speak French. I speak English (cat), Esperanto (kato), Norwegian (katt), and have a working knowledge of German (Katze).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aaron345820

help me i suck

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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What kind of help do you need? There are qualified Esperanto teachers here who can answer your questions, or do you just have trouble with the cat and mouse drama?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cavman144
Cavman144
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bad kitty!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Ĉu estis akcidento?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaimeRump
JaimeRump
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The pattern I'm seeing is that -ig turn an intransitive verb transitive, eg: x died -> x killed y, and -igx does the opposite, x improved y -> x improved. Is that an accurate description?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogBenTz1
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kubissx
Kubissx
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F

1 month ago