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  5. "Guarda nella scatola."

"Guarda nella scatola."

Translation:He looks in the box.

January 18, 2014

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dperrtr

what's in the box? OH MY GOD, WHAT'S IN THE BOX?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ekedin

Cos'รจ nella scatola!!?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roberto.ve16

tin=lattina jar=barattolo box=scatola(something square)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kimberlytylr

Can this also be the imperative form? As in: Look in the box!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flutterheart

I assumed it was the imperative and put it as the translation. Unfortunately it was marked as incorrect :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tallman69

@flutterheart One thing I noticed with Duo is wherever they use the imperative, the sentence always ends with an exclamation point! I'm not sure why. One might surmise that Italians always shout their commands. LOL
But seriously, I've never seen an imperative sentence in Duo that didn't end with an !. It's a reliable indicator.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isoiso007

It is true, most European grammaar needs an exclamation point after imerative sentences. Spanish even use one upside down in the beginning of an imperative sentence. Of course, it's not shouting, it just helps the reader comprehending the text faster.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carrie754163

He or she should be accepted as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tallman69

Correct. Absent context, there is no other indication. He or she should both be acceptable translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiggoGalac1

Why can't this be a "he?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rex218050

There's a cat in there. It will either live or die when you look. Poor cat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roman397757

Not quite! It's dead and alive at the same time until you look. ;) Undead cat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kukla721728

I put she looks in the box what's wrong with that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brunoandrad17

This can be very tricky for Portuguese learners as "guarda" means "he/she keeps something" in Portuguese.

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