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  5. "He is older than her."

"He is older than her."

Translation:Il est plus vieux qu'elle.

January 24, 2013

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tani17
  • 2221

Why is Vieux plural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

"vieux" is both singular and plural. However its feminine counterpart "vieille" has a plural form: "vieilles".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gambelguy

Note that "older than her" is incorrect English. This is a very common error, but, nonetheless, an error. The complete sentence is "He is older than she is."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mattmcca

plusâgé is not a word


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

You're right. But "plus âgé" are. It means "older".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jpennajunior

Why not PLUS VIEIL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

"vieil" is used before a vowel or a mute "h".

  • un vieil animal
  • un vieux lion

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MDP_81

why not Il est plus ancien qu'elle!!?!??!!?!?!?!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Most of the time we don't use "ancien" (as an adjective) for people, at least not for the meaning "old" (age).

We can use it however to mean "old" (ex-) for someone who lost his position (or anything like that):

  • l'ancien entraîneur de l'équipe

We can also use it to mean "old" (age) as a noun:

  • les anciens de ce village

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QMUUXYwJ

The English phrase should be, 'He is older than she.' I've decided that DL has chosen not to enforce correct grammar in favour of some careless common usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickyginger

I put "Il a plus age qu'elle", but it turns out it should have been "il est plus age qu'elle". But in French you don't say, I AM 20 year old, you say I HAVE 20 years. So why is it he IS more old than her, rather than he HAS more age than her?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Because adjectives are used with what we call in French "un verbe d'état" (a stative verb).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stative_verb

Here are all the stative verbs in French :

"être, devenir, paraître, sembler, demeurer, rester, avoir l'air, passer pour"

When adjectives are used with such verbs they're called "adjectif attribut".

Of course they can be used without a verb as well, then they're either "adjectif épithète" (not separated from the noun) or "adjectif apposé" (separated from the noun by a comma).

Watch out because it seems that English names for these categories are misleading. For example it seems that "adjectif épithète" is called "attributive adjective" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickDaniel1

Why not que lui ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Because the exercise uses feminine for the object, and masculine for the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvertedGo

Because "elle" only becomes "lui" when it is an indirect object and is placed in front of the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jesada.t

Can we use the "avoir plus de l'âge" or something of the similar construction here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

"avoir plus de l'âge" isn't correct French. You can use either "être plus vieux que" or "être plus âgé que".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deljaroo

So, is 'elle' used for both the subject 'she' and the object 'her'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arjofocolovi

Yes, although "her" can also be translated with other words:

  • "tell him/her" = "dis-lui"
  • "kiss her" = "embrasse la"

Have a look here: http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/pronouns.htm

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