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  5. "C'è pure scritto."

"C'è pure scritto."

Translation:It is even written.

January 24, 2013

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

Yeah, we really need an "IDIOM ALERT!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/killary45

An asterisk or italics for the first few times an idiom appears would be most welcome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablogc2000

I don't really think this is an idiom. I just did a literal translation to "it is also written" and it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferrimed

C'è = there is and not It is = è so you didn't do a literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheGandalf

But "pure" seems to primarily mean "even". It's an awkward sentence, in my opinion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeamusCoon

But my "It is written also" was rejected!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/matt.kalebic

Why "c'è" and not "'è"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2548

A literal translation would include "there", which is what "ci" is there for: it's idiomatic though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JACurry1973

Help me f.formica - L'italiano e un linguaggio molto difficile!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mary.gh86

I wrote "There's also written" and it was not accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZibbiG

What does "there's also written" mean???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

I don't think that's proper english.. And I'm a native. :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaice_10

someone could explain us what is the meaning of this ideomatic sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2548

Say you hadn't stamped your train ticket and claimed that you didn't know you had to; the train officer might go "Andiamo, c'è pure scritto!", "Come on now, it's even written (on the ticket)". Just an example out of many; this idiom is generally used when pointing out that you should know something because you're supposed to have read it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfjacobs

This happened to me on the train from the airport in Rome. My Italian wasn't good enough to explain to the conductor why I hadn't done it. Luckily there was another American there who explained that I was a poor, confused American tourist and convinced the conductor not to fine me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tom_vincenzo

I can't see how it's an idiom. it seems to me to be a perfectly literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregHullender

It's not an idiom. Whenever a language is different from English, some people cry "idiom!" but, in truth, Duolingo almost never uses real idioms.

Real idioms are fragile. Almost any change breaks them. For example, "He kicked the bucket" is a real idiom. We cannot say "The bucket was kicked by him" without invoking a real bucket.

This makes idioms very hard for beginners and even intermediate students to use. Duolingo wisely stays away from them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeamusCoon

Nice explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dhunteroz

So then "It's even written there" is correct as well? In english we can say "There, it's even written" (note the comma or pause).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

It's an idiom because c'è means there is. The translation DL gives us is "It is even written". A literal translation (" There is even written " ) would not make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macossay

"It is even written there," is accepted Aug 2018.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferrimed

if we take it literally, "there is also written" should be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fificat1

And so it is written, and so it is done...(sorry, couldn't resist)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristineH636916

This barely makes sense in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanJSDK

Why not just e? why c'e?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimK77777

"It is even written there."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasDo2

"It too is written" no good here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Koolkaren

Seems good to me. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilZam

I appreciate that this has been decalred an idiomatic saying, but could someone tell me how you would say "he even wrote to us"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2548

"Ci ha pure scritto", "Ci ha anche scritto", "Ha scritto pure a noi", "Ha scritto anche a noi".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkpeak

This translation is nonsensical


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkpeak

sounds biblical to me!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flying_Blue

I really tried to figure this one out but the 'c'è absolutely threw me off!
I guess the closest thing I can think of now that I read where this might be used would be "It's even spelled out!", "There, it's even spelled out!" or "It's even spelled out right there!"
Are any of those accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnR243396

Would "there it is also written" be acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjojoe

It is also written...??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusieOpperia

Why would this not be “It was even written” or “It has been written”? I thought we were studying Passato Prossimo. Is it just because it’s an idiom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat590727

what's the difference between c'e pure scritto and 'e pure scritto?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SkippyOKnee

È scritto isnt present tense, right? In the spirit of the tense we are learning in this section, I translated it, "it has also been written" but it wasnt accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaniceQuinn0

This sentence is meaningless to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egregor1

Cannot get the 'pure' out of this. Is it my hearing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlphaCentauri

This sentence is not good English. I hope the Italian-to-English people aren't getting this question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoamMor

As far as I understand it, in this sentence, "è" translates to "it is" and "Ci" to "there". The literal translation is "it is even written there".

"C'è" would translate to something like "it is there", not to "there is" like we got used to.

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