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https://www.duolingo.com/EpicGermanLearn

why exactly are you learning esperanto?

I never understood the whole esperanto-thing, it all seems pretty pointless to me personally for several reasons, so Id like to hear what you folks think and why you chose to learn esperanto?

just curious, no h8, m8.

2 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/homacxo

Some of the reasons. I'm extremely tired so I might have forgotten some important ones..

1) I wanted to learn a new language without any kind of pressure. I already speak 4-6 languages, depending on how you want to count it so it didn't seem crucial to learn yet another "more useful language" . I also wanted a break from the competitive language learning at the university.

2) I like the ideology and culture. There's something charmingly old-fashioned about the ideals of Esperanto, being a neutral language(/culture) for everyone, building bridges between different groups people and so on. It's different from those modern individualistic online subcultures that I can't get a hang of. Maybe I'm terribly old-school but nevermind, I prefer Esperanto culture. :D

2,5) I know I sound like an Esperanto cult member but I'd rather be in an Esperanto "cult" than a real one. People need communities and "Esperantoland" is not the worst option. (But yet, you don't have to become a full-blown 24/7 Esperantist and visit every congress out there. I think I already said this somewhere here on the forums but Esperanto doesn't require any "secret handshakes".)

3) It provides an alternative - although theoretical - to English. I do like English but I also find it really difficult and I can't use it effortlessly, which is a bit irritating when everything is in English. Of course I still use English but at least now I have a choice!

4) It combines elements from several languages and has nice letters with hats. Some people learn languages only because they sound/look nice. Some people, like me, just really like hats.

6) It might be pointless if you're looking for a language that reaches as many people as possible or a business language (it might be a good business language though, it's just not yet out there on a larger scale :P) but you will reach people in every corner of the world through Esperanto.

7) It can be a nice hobby or a brain exercise and it helps learning other languages as well (common vocabulary + learning keeps the language related parts of the brain active). Being an easy and logical language, it's not as frustrating as other languages so if you want to study a language just for fun, it might be good option! (Though some people do like obscure grammar..)

I swear I'm not here to convert anyone, no matter how brainwashed I might sound!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

1) I wanted to learn a new language without any kind of pressure. 2) I like the ideology and culture. There's something charmingly old-fashioned about the ideals of Esperanto, being a neutral language(/culture) for everyone, building bridges between different groups people and so on. 4) It combines elements from several languages and has nice letters with hats. 6) It might be pointless if you're looking for a language that reaches as many people as possible or a business language (it might be a good business language though, it's just not yet out there on a larger scale :P) but you will reach people in every corner of the world through Esperanto.

All of these are spot on mate. I couldn't have said it better myself which is why I'm stealing your words!

Diru ilin! BaldaĆ­... Ni konkeros la mondon! MUAHAHAHAH

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzsuzsi
jzsuzsi
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Your reason with the hats was the best :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicGermanLearn

thanks for your input, some of those reasons surprise me though @.@

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pripensi
pripensi
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Originally started because why not, it seemed interesting.

The reasons I continue are:

1) I like the language's system.

2) I approve of the ideal of trying to make an easy international language for all, and think Esperanto fulfills that purpose pretty well.

3) I've met a lot of great and interesting people in the community.

4) I learned a lot and bettered myself through it. Now I have more knowledge of languages and how to discipline myself to learn them. Esperanto is my second language, not counting Spanish, which I'm not comfortable in my ability to speak with and learn because of school. Esperanto is my true second language in my mind.

Might be forgetting some.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LunjoTO

For me, it started as a second language that seemed to be attainable after school French and German didn't take. As I taught myself Esperanto from books in the pre-internet age, I read about the Esperanto community, its diversity and scope, and decided to join the local club (which has been in existence since 1906 except for during WWI and II). I met people there who are still friends almost twenty years later and also made the acquaintance of many travellers with whom I would not be able to communicate without Esperanto. I've also used Esperanto to speak with Canadian Francophones who would otherwise struggle with English, as I would struggle with the bit of French I can still manage.

Learning Esperanto also helped me to figure out what works for me with language learning, skills that I'm now using to learn Dutch on Duolingo (close to my heritage language of Flemish). After I'm comfortable with Dutch, I plan to revisit French and German, then move on to Norwegian, then maybe Spanish and Italian.

Not too shabby an ambition for someone who "failed" at learning a second language over 40 years ago.

If you're ever in Toronto, Canada, drop by for a visit.

http://www.meetup.com/Esperanto-Toronto/

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EpicGermanLearn

That's interesting, and I am actually in toronto alot (I live in hamilton).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LunjoTO

Hamilton has a club now.

http://www.meetup.com/Esperanto-Hamilton/

If you decide to try Esperanto out, you can join the page and contact Tiffany for details. Some of the Hamilton people also travel to Toronto for our Komencanto Sundays from time to time. Hope to meet you sometime.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Oh, we're practically neighbors. I really need to get a passport. (I'm in New York.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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I ended up minoring in German in college. I remember the day midway through my first semester course when I was looking at my professor and sounds were coming out - and I understood them - and I was struck with the thought, as he continued to speak in German and I continued to understand, what an amazing phenomenon that was, because only a short time before I would not have had a clue what he was saying.

Several years later, I started learning Esperanto almost on a whim and had that same experience again. People make sounds - and I understand what they're telling me. Its wonderful. In a few months I spoke better Esperanto than German (which I had spent three years learning) and to this day, I am very much more comfortable speaking Esperanto than German in spite of several trips to Germany and countless hours working on my German.

I'm not going to list the reasons (others are doing a good job at that) but I will say that Esperanto has been many times more useful to me than German has ever been -- which seems counter-intuitive, I'm sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

LOL yah it's counter intuitive, Esperanto haz leike NO speekurz.

-_-

;)

I feel similarly but as I haven't met anyone that speaks Esperanto, the magic comes from reading something in Esperanto and knowing what it means immediately as a stupid grin shimmies onto my face.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blUE_BaSkEt_GirL

I started learning because of a competition called NaLaLeaMo! (National language learning month) We had to finish one tree in one month, and I picked Esperanto. :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Clever to pick what is probably the easiest! Good thinking.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fractal_shadow
fractal_shadow
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Esperanto is easy, lots of people speak it, it's fun and no-pressure, and there are a lot of books and online news sources in Esperanto. I feel like I have achieved a level of fluency in just a few months that took a few years to reach when I was studying French in school.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OnesimusUnbound

Meeting diverse people is my main reason for studying Esperanto. It may have around hundreds of thousand speakers yet they are spread around the globe.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eaburns
eaburnsPlus
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It's fun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Platypus01

Lots of reasons that are similar to mine. But one of the major drivers for me is that, over the years, I have tried to learn German, Japanese and recently Italian and I have had great trouble. Learning Esperanto is to prove to myself I can do it. Also, I totally get what Zamenhof was trying to do.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foudeb
Foudeb
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It's easy, it's fun, the ideals behind it are cool. Come on, you know you want to join us... ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Is that like 'come on in the language is lovely'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foudeb
Foudeb
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jes ja!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/selfish440

I "learned" Spanish in MS/HS, and by learned I mean retained enough to pass the requirements. After HS, I've unsuccessfully tried to learn Spanish and Portuguese, but those didn't stick. With Esperanto supposedly being a universal, constructed language, I thought perhaps I'm start with that, and with the confidence I'd gain in knowing/understanding one language, I'd then move on to other languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Indarozino

I had been wanting to learn a second language for a while but struggled because I couldn't decide

I speak a little Spanish - mostly what I have picked up being around immigrant friends but Latino doesn't really appeal to me ... maybe Castilian would be awesome.

Korean, Japanese and Chinese seemed cool but I couldn't decide between them (and I think the course I tried for Chinese wasn't very good). I really like the looks of the Korean writing system.

Both Canadian and European French seemed awesome and romantic but should I learn them first or German? or maybe Italian.

Then I realized that my desire was not to learn a second language and settle with that but to learn as many as possible... but where to start?

Then I saw this Ted Talk https://youtu.be/8gSAkUOElsg and I was enthralled. I'd never heard of Esperanto before. A made up language that draws from other languages, evolves, acts as a springboard for other languages and is an equalizing language? Sign me up!

I was hooked and my inner anthropologist was drooling with excitement.

So I created an account on Lernu.net and from the forums there learned about Duolingo.

Today Esperanto tomorrow! ... um Korean or Canadian French I haven't decided....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2_K_
2_K_
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In my case it was: why not learn it? It exists, it's easier to learn than other languages, learning and knowing stuff about any language is fun (and never pointless :-P ).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kumko
kumko
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George Soros as fluent esperantist took part in esperanto conference in Switzerland in 1946 and used that as opportunity to flee Hungary ruled by soviets at that time. So... you never know, when esperanto can come in handy ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StephieRice
StephieRice
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Many reasons.

Perhaps the most interesting are just the ones related to language learning itself. Learning Esperanto before another language is generally easier and on top of that will help you learn other languages as demonstrated by studies with teaching Esperanto in the UK and showing the students who were learning Esperanto first had a better time deciphering French than the students who were learning French first.

http://www.fluentin3months.com/2-weeks-of-esperanto/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gSAkUOElsg

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajtjp
ajtjp
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I'd heard of Esperanto before and it seemed like a somewhat interesting idea. It also seemed like a good way to get back into studying a language, with perhaps a more attainable goal than if I tried, say, Finnish, even though I am a fan of Finnish music. True, it's less practical than Spanish or French would be to me, but I also wanted to have a decent chance of getting good at it without a huge commitment, and the only other real option for that was French, due to having previously studied it enough to be almost good at it. As it is, I figured I'll start with Esperanto, and if I get good at it, then it'll be time to brush up on French again and perhaps plan a trip to Quebec.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Viola705559

My reason could seem strange: I started learning Esperanto because I don't think that an already existent language should be the international language. The Americans and the British are advantaged! For example, I have to write this comment in English so everyone can understand, but I'm Italian, and it's pretty hard for me to write without mistakes. It's not fair! So, a neutral language is the best option, because everybody have to learn a new language and we won't have differences.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Signor_Nessuno
Signor_Nessuno
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Hi! I've begun learning some Esperanto three months ago - though I have put it somewhat aside to focus on German.

I was just curious about the best-known conlang and I decided to give it a chance.

For me personally, learning Esperanto was a way to get acquainted with agglutination/suffixes, which will be useful as I start learning Hungarian (hopefully in a few days/weeks), in a simpler set...

Also, I like Esperanto being a 'niche' language in spite of its creator's hopes of it becoming a universal language, it is something unique in my opinion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Most of what everyone else said, especially the hats. Its fun and makes for a great quasi secret language between friends and family.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FattigJente
FattigJente
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Gotta say it amuses me how many people say they like it as a "secret language."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Not secret of course but in a country with an estimated 2000 to 3000 esperanto speakers it might as well be, since it is highly unlikely i would run inot one at random. though since duo is making it popular i guess it won't be for long, but that is cool too, it will give me more people to practice with. So win win.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FattigJente
FattigJente
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haha, right. well, is Esperanto available in any language other than English? if most people end up learning Esperanto via English on Duolingo that doesn't enhance its utility as an international language that much but it can still be fun

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Esperanto from spanish is in the incubator and no doubt more will follow

Also fun, more fun, fun forever etc. Can you tell I am in Favour of fun?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrandaUrso

Aliuloj ne povas kompreni nin! Ni devas diri ion sekrete....Katidoj!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fantomius
Fantomius
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Esperanto from Spanish is in the incubator and no doubt more will follow.

Out of curiosity, which language(s) do you think will follow Spanish?

As for me, I'm guessing German, then French. Then maybe Italian.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ionasky
ionasky
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Not sure, depends on who is available, fluent in The other languages and wants to take it on. Its a lot of hard work

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajtjp
ajtjp
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I think I heard something about Portuguese way back when. So that's my guess. amuzulo lives in Berlin though and is fluent in German, so that would also be a good candidate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fantomius
Fantomius
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(This is a shorter version of a post I wrote earlier. The earlier (and longer) post can now be found in this thread: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/15894400 )

I want everyone who wants to speak to me to be able to do so, and not be constrained by the language barrier. Already knowing English is nice, but let's face it -- I shouldn't have to require everyone who wants to speak with me to learn English.

So I'll meet everyone half-way: I'll learn Esperanto, and if you desire to speak with me, you can learn Esperanto as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGXCB

"I'll meet everyone half way", I like that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I have friends who spend more time and effort following reality TV than I do learning Esperanto.

It's as pointless as Sudoku or crossword puzzles and people seem to be ok with those :).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DougRogers

I love this. When you talk to people about Esperanto they so often act like it must be learned for some idealistic reason, which I admit I do like the ideals that the language was based off of, but learning a new language has been proven to be one of, if not the most, effective brain building exercise/game. I've had friends act like it was pointless because English is so popular and "what's the point?" meanwhile they are obsessing over playing Xbox and memorizing rap lyrics. The point to learning any new language, or doing anything really that is enjoyable, is at least as worthwhile as watching a TV show or playing a game you might enjoy.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hussab

I'm learning Esperanto because it tries to regularise everything except root word morphology, which is entirely derived from loanwords. So in short, I'm learning the language to know more lesser known loanwords.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DougRogers

I'm learning Esperanto because I am hoping to use it as my root language that I learn other languages with, especially on Duolingo. My plan is to keep knocking it out on the Spanish and English version, then when the Portuguese version is available I will learn Esperanto from that and continue the trend as it continues to be added to other languages like, and especially, Italian and French. In other words, I am hoping to stop learning other languages from English with the help of Esperanto

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NoahVallis
NoahVallis
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Because I love the whole idea of a language that can break international linguistic barriers (although this may not have turned out they way its creator wanted it too). I was fascinated with its history and also wanted to each out to other people interested in this language and other languages.

1 year ago