"Senere dagen"

Translation:Later in the day

May 3, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elledhwen

Isn't "later today" the same thing? Or it refers to a general day, like "the usually go to play golf later during the day (not now that's still morning)"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig
Mod
  • 252

'later today' = 'senere i dag'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TKPolo

Why would "later that day" be incorrect? Would that b "Senere den dagen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paolo_Mocci

I think it would be "senere på den dagen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christian.920

Why is "på" used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorun-la

If we're talking about parts of the "døgn" (the "day and night") and about seasons, we often use "på" when we want to specify closer when something takes place or took place:

"Nokså tidlig på morgenen." (Fairly early in the morning.) "Midt på dagen." (At noon.) "Litt seinere/senere på sommeren." (A little later in the summer.)

If we are seeing the "døgn" (or parts of it), upcoming or bygone hours or seasons seen from current hour, "i" is the most common preposition:

"I morges" (This morning) "I dag" (Today) "I kveld" (Tonight) "I natt" (Tonight) "I går" (Yesterday) "I fjor" (Last year) "I morgen" (Tomorrow) "I neste måned" (In the next month) "I sommer" (This summer) "I høst" (In autumn)

http://www.sprakradet.no/sprakhjelp/Skriverad/Preposisjonsbruk_bm/I_eller_paa/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Creator13

Why is "Later on the day" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NewYorkOreo

Even though "på" directly translates to "on", the phrase "Later on the day" is not correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacekRosik

Isn't "later during the day" mean the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neves.Gabriel

Why does google translator translate "later" to "seinere" instead of "senere"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorun-la

It's just another way of writing the word. I belive it's more common to use "senere", so I recommend you use it, but "in real life" you will be understood if you use "seinere" as well. It might be more dialect to say "seinere".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alvasilvao

I think that would be nynorsk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shamshoomi

Does anyone else see that "senere" sounds like, and has the same meaning of, the Turkish word "sonra"?

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