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"Estoy tomando agua."

Translation:I am drinking water.

5 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WimXL
WimXL
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Of course you can take water when asked what to drink.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Yep. Pretty common in my neck of the woods. Drinking spirits "I'll take it on the rocks". Tea "I take mine with sugar and milk" etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

TOMAR= TO DRINK OR TO TAKE

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Youmeanthatguy
Youmeanthatguy
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If "tomar" means "to take", then "tomando" means "taking" and should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miajav
miajav
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Why not "I am taking water" (say, to the picnic, while you are taking sandwiches)?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chingmoj
Chingmoj
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Or on a mountain bike trip?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

THAT WOULD BE TRAER OR LLEVAR

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnKTaylor

In that situation you would use the verb "traer" (to take) or "llevar" (to bring).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

Tienes razón

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cavman144
Cavman144
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what's the difference between "bebiendo" as in drinking, and "tomando" also as in drinking?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

Tomar is more likely to be used for ordering a drink, like "I'll take water" (tomaré agua), as well as alcohol and a few other colloquial points. From what i've gathered it would sound a little odd to say "estoy tomando agua" to mean I'm drinking water - i think one would use beber for that. However, "estoy tomando vino" would work.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

I'm still just learning though so I might be wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alanrudd1951

Tomar is to take, so tomando is taking. Tomando agua

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Literally "taking" but " I'm having water" is a good response to someone's question about what you'll be drinking.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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That may well be true, but there is no question in this example--just an utterance without context. And so without context, "taking" should be OK as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scottie92

i put "i'm taking water" and it's not accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donrua1

Cool how they can say a sentence while they are drinking water. I would likely drown.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EuroSpanish

That's Latin American Spanish. Surely a Spaniard would use "bebiendo".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AuntieE
AuntieE
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Estoy always sounds like este,

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dare3966
Dare3966
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especially in the slower mode

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Gracias, barithedog. Llegar is the verb that came to my mind, but I wasn't sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deen14

i am taking water not accepted as of today April 11 2016. I believe it should be accepted and I am reporting it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaneHDallis

Bad pronunciation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartaPareta

El agua ( y cualquier otro líquido) se BEBE!!! Es una pena que quienes quieren aprender español tengan tantos malos ejemplos de pronunciación y expresiones. Coloquialmente decimos "voy a tomar agua", pero lo correcto es decir "voy a beber agua".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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What is wrong for your Spanish dialect doesn't have to be wrong in a different dialect.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pieter198825

And I am Coca Cola!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Taking water is definitely more acceptable than passing water...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnie.sjoberg

Tomando is taking. Buscando is drinking. And, of course, in archaic English one might use taking in place of either drinking or eating. But in Spanish, to be clear, wouldn't it be better to say "Estoy buscando agua."?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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I guess you made a typo and meant "bebiendo" not "buscando". Anyway native speakers have mentioned in the discussion that "tomar" (in its various forms) is commonly used to mean "to drink".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnie.sjoberg

Yes, I'm really tired today and made a big typo. Thanks for pointing it out. I'm still concerned about the difference between drinking some water and putting some water in a pail and running away :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Well, it is fairly common to use tomar, but not really as a substitute for drinking... here you're seeing one example and it's worth to take some perspective... Do not be astronomers (http://changeofbasis.blogspot.de/2012/02/astronomer-physicist-and-mathematician.html)

Now, in English it is possible to use "having" too. "Are you having some tea there?" ...have something to eat?

I would say that most of the times that having is used in English in the food/eating context, tomar can be used in Spanish. The reason is because you are not 100% referring to the drinking process but to the fact that the subject is "intaking" something.

So if you go to a pub and the waiter asks what will it be? you intermediately assume he is not asking if you are having a baby. In Spanish "tomar" is widely used in this context, not as a substitute of drinking, but as a verb that takes the action of "intaking for a while" and often in social context:

¿Qué tomas? ¿Te traigo una cerveza? No gracias, estoy tomando vino ¿Queréis tomar algo de comer?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

It says "blogspot does not exist"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

It says "blogspot does not exist"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Yeah it is a bit odd at first glance. I guess it evolved from "take a drink" over time "drink" may have seemed redundant in the phrases. We do use "take a pill" in English and essentially that usually means drinking a liquid to wash down the pill or at the very least it implies more possibilities than merely grabbing a pill to most people. So maybe its not so odd.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bonnie.sjoberg

These comments are all very interesting on the meaning of tomar.

But I was still wondering if tomar can be used in the sense of taking something away. So I used Google Translate for the sentence "I am taking this pail of water" and it translated as "Hago uso de este balde de agua."

Is this correct? Or is there another more common way of saying "I am taking this (pail of water)?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barithedog
barithedog
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You can "take" the pail if what you wanted to convey was this: "Coger o asir con la mano algo (RAE)" If the emphasis is on taking the pail "away" or "somewhere" I would use llevar.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aprit
aprit
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Rocko2012, you are absolutely correct. In college, I learned that tomar and beber could both be used to mean to drink. Like many English words, Spanish words have multiple meanings. Sometimes English speaker forget that when learning a new language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Aprit, I also agree with Rocko2012 and you. I learned and heard many times that "tomar" can be used like beber to mean "drink". Now I just read devaux's contribution about individual differences according to country.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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CORRECTION: Sorry I spelled your name wrong, davux. If I checked it I would have had to write the comment all over!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davux
davux
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Literally: - tomar means to take - beber means to drink

In practice, it depends on the country. In Spain, it's more common to say "beber agua" and e.g. "tomar el metro", "tomar algo en el suelo" (take something on the floor), although you can also say "tomar agua". In Mexico, Peru, Chile (at least), "tomar agua" is far more common than "beber agua". However, you would say "beber alcohol" rather than "tomar alcohol", or "él bebe mucho" (he drinks a lot, meaning alcohol).

And of course, as WimXL pointed out, when asked what you'd like to drink you would use "tomar", but then it would mean "order", and it also applies to food so that's a different topic.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Also in Latin America, if you use tomar with no object, it means alcohol. Él toma mucho.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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DL dinged me on 'take water'. I live in Belize and the spanish speakers here use tomar to say drink. And in english they will say they are 'taking a beer' etc

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Thank you davux and cdhicks, I really want to know the variations from country to country, especially phrases that are used a lot, such as this one.

2 years ago