"Les Européens aiment manger du bœuf."

Translation:Europeans like to eat beef.

4 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/paulscon

les indiens n'aiment pas manger du boeuf

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aquitania09

Ni moi non plus, car je suis végétarienne :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jliusiwei

The "I" needs to be capitalized in your statement because you are referring to people. That's the rule for languages/nationalities. When it's used to refer to people, it's capitalized. When it's used as an adjective or used to refer to the language, then it is not capitalized. Take French for example:

Le français = the French language

Le Français = the French man

Les Français = the French people

Le peuple français = the French people/population

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Reece970298
Reece970298
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I may be wrong but I think if a verb, noun or prepo follows ne [___] verb you don't write pas ex. Je ne sais quoi Je ne peux maintenant I'm not sure if this rule applies for verbs though

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tomboysquirrel

Ce Canadienne aime aussi manger du bœuf! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/casperrenting
casperrenting
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Cette :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfredo.pl

I said love instead of like and I lost a heart... I thought you could use both...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saccarozy
saccarozy
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same here...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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There are Tips & Notes available on Duolingo which explain how it works with "aimer". Here is the short version:

  • aimer (referring to people) means "love"
  • aimer (referring to things or actions, i.e., before a noun or a verb) means "like"
  • aimer bien (with people) means "like" ("bien" softens the verb)
  • adorer (with things or people) means "adore" or "love"; it can also mean "worship" in the appropriate context.

This is the way "aimer" is interpreted throughout Duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/declanp45

also, anyone clarify this ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simpy3
simpy3
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Aimer + anything not human = like Aimer + human = love

Adorer would be more appropriate. And if you wish to use Aimer with a person to mean "like", slip in bien. E.g. J'aime bien Sidney (I like Sidney.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeValley1

And I was marked wrong for saying "European people" after trying "Japanese" for "Les japanois" and being told the answer was "Japanese people."

Go figure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neil-VA5SCA
Neil-VA5SCA
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First wine, now beef; Duo certainly likes to make sweeping statements about the diet of Europeans!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mega-Pidgey

i like weiners

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ms_World
Ms_World
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Not if I move there. I'm with aquitania09! Les animaux sont mes amis.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wuGwkW5y

I thought aimer bien = like and aimer is to love

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IWannaLearn3
IWannaLearn3
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I'm offended.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/9p0yWATL

I'm trying to understand the liaison rules/conventions. Can anyone tell me why in the earlier "Les Européens aiment noire du vin" the speaker connected the "s" sound at the end of Européens to the leading sound of aiment and in this one they didn't? Is it optional in some cases?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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The rule is « no connection or liaison between a noun-subject (EuropéenS) and the verb (aiment). In your first sentence «  Les Européens aiment boire du vin », probably it was an error of Duolingo.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulo135855
Paulo135855
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Les Brésiliens aime mange du bœf

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philipo79

If this is about beef in general then why is "de boeuf" not accepted? Doesn't "du boeuf" mean some beef?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MoosaJ
MoosaJ
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I believe this is the reason: Because beef is general we have to us 'Le Bœuf' and the fragment before it is 'manger de'. Therefore it becomes 'manger de + le bœuf' = 'manger du bœuf'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saccarozy
saccarozy
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I think the French tend to use "de la" or "du(de le)" in every not-so-definite cases. Meaning that, if it is not "le boeuf" then it is "du boeuf" OR if it is not "la viande" it is "de la viande"... in most contexts...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Platten

"Rosbif" is French slang for the English so I think I know which European's the naughty owl means.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasting98
Jasting98
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As an English speaker, I would still say "I love to eat beef" or "I love the Big Ben" even though they are not human. Here they use "aimer" which should still thus be translated as "to love" for non-human things, right?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jliusiwei

"Aimer" means "to like" in general. It's only used to mean love when it's used in a romantic sense. If you want to say "I love" for non-human things and activities, you would say "J'adore."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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When we set our mind on "aimer" means "love" every time we see it, we miss out that there are many French words (and some English ones, too) that mean slightly different things when they are in a different context. In the context of people, "aimer" means love. In the context of things "aimer" means like. If you want to "love" something other than a person, use "adorer".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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I don't think the joining to read between "européens" and "aiment" (...zem") is correct. It sounds unusual to me. On the other hand , in "ils aiment", the link must be done.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

"les européens" is obligatory/required, whereas, "européens aiment" is optional.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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I don't think the joining between "européens aiment" is optional. That is just wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

I'm not sure whether you are a native speaker or not, but as a learner, I try my best to learn the language the correct way.
Check the link below, and note that the first thing listed in optional liaisons is "After Plural Nouns" and the examples are very similar to the sentence here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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Hello YahyaZuhair, Sorry, I am not à native speaker, just someone who is living in France since à few décades and I have never heard anyone speaking or reading such à sentence with liaison. To be really sure, I have asked thé French Academy, and their answer is : " on ne fait pas la liaison entre le nom sujet et le verbe " ( there is no liaison between a noun subject with the verb.).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olyglotED
olyglotED
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what's the hard rule on whether to use "le/la/les/las" vs "de/du" when trying to make a generality (a statement that is understood without articles such as this one....- Is it related to people vs. objects? ...always confusing to me, as "Les Europeens" here means "Europeans" in general--seems cut from the same rule. as "du vin" etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair
  • When speaking about something in general, we use the definite articles 'le, la, les'
    Les Européens aiment manger du bœuf ; Europeans in general
  • After verbs that involve emotions (like, love, hate...etc), the general article is used.
    J'aime le chocolat ; I like chocolate, cos I like chocolate in general, as in all types of chocolate.
  • When referring to a specific thing.
    La voiture est noire ; the car is black, a specific car is being mentioned.
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olyglotED
olyglotED
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thank you. yes, I know that part of the rule. but look at your first example---"du boeuf" Why do we use "du" for a general there and "les" for the general in terms of the Europeans? In the next example you say "le chocolat" and it seems to me very much the same way as "du boeuf" was used. Am I wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

I can understand your struggle.
I'll try to explain how I understand it.

When saying "I like/love chocolate", we're using the definite article to mean generality, as I love all the chocolate in the world, for anything that is chocolate, I love it.
When we're saying "eat beef", we cannot use the definite article, cos simply, we cannot eat all the beef in the world. We can love them all, but can't eat them all.

The "Les Européens" is just a statement meaning that generally, or all Europeans, like to eat beef.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olyglotED
olyglotED
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Merci! I knew it was something along those lines, but I wanted to hear someone explain it from a point of view. Very helpful stuff. Genial.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YahyaZuhair

Glad to help you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nqmpdj
nqmpdj
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" le, la , les" are définite articles used to define a general catégory of thing, animal or people already identified or easily recognizable : LE français, LE boeuf, LA table... When LE is associated with some preposition as "de" or "à", it is replaced by DU or AU: Je vais ( à le marché) AU marché: I go to the market Je mange DE LA viande But Je mange (DE LE bœuf) = Je mange DU boeuf. À+ LE = AU and À + LES= AUX Je fais faire des devoirs ( à les étudiants) AUX étudiants

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenRoberts02
BenRoberts02
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Is this an existing predjudice?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeblancHer
LeblancHer
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Manger du boeuf est un préjudice pour les boeufs

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mutterholle
mutterholle
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Ne pas généraliser!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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Why is the o and e in boeuf stuck together. Same with oeuf, and a few others I cannot think of at this moment...Why is it, and what is this called in grammar?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bouchka1
Bouchka1
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Duo accepts "Japanese people" not "European people" . Why ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thea-chan

true yum I am Serbian

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diego.bajetti

Bonjour

1 year ago
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