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  5. "Du trägst meinen Fisch."

"Du trägst meinen Fisch."

Translation:You are carrying my fish.

January 20, 2014

95 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniHaywood

Haha! I forgot that "tragen" can mean carry as well as "wear", at first I was thinking, "You're wearing my fish."?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pilato82

I Did! 5 minutes ago a bear was wearing dresses, I thought it was possible


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanisDonic

same mindset here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lara-Anne

I'm Afrikaans and wear and carry is also the same word, so it's really easy for me to learn German


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siren964

Same in Russian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/changaputi74

and in Romanian - a purta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/urshadow

It's like that in Latvian too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

In swedish too, trough I stupidly translated the sentence as "You are wearing a fish".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaB_Duolingo

Not so silly! If Lady Gaga can wear a meat dress, why not a fish? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoBlackma3

Or a fish Halloween costume? Or a play?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quarkenger

In Spanish as well, maybe English is actually the odd one out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ada335790

In Igbo the words are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalvarezLugo

It's not exactly the same in Mexican Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zhenya10000

Not the exact same in Sinhalese, but carrying (genayanawa) is within the word for wearing (andagenayanawa). The latter word literally means (one is) carrying the dress/clothe (with oneself).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kschmitt25

me too I almost wrote that in till I said it out loud


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LysolPionex

Yeah, I was totally confused for a second there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maor074

I tought it was another joke of dou


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pgnlangue

For a second i thought Duo got wild again and was saying you are wearing my fish.. Lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardbk

Should be able to wear your fish if they want to!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rorschach7697

but how do you which is which?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalomeLaLa

... But given that bears regularly wear dresses in Duolingo world, I fear that context is not necessarily a help here ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladimrCingel

I was thinking like... it's odd but why not. One can wear a fish dress... It's 21st century and I can't keep up with the fashion trends for sure


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve34747

It is possible for that to happen. If you're talking to someone who is wearing your fish, that's what you would say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMsAuntie

Same thing here. "Wear" and "carry" are the same in some other languages I know as well...but it still totally caught me off guard...and made me giggle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zgrda

Lool same here listened like 10 times


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veganpanda

I only knew "trägst" as wearing, had no clue it meant carry too :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IceKreamKuhn

Wasn't introduced previously, I was confused too haha. It's the same in Spanish, incidentally (tragen in German = llevar in Spanish = to wear, to carry).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniHaywood

It's the same in French too! Porter = to wear/carry. It's funny when there are such clear links between European languages but that don't exist in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yupsi

It's also the same in Russian. Clearly this goes beyond one continent :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/discen.tiago

Portuguese has "portar", but nowadays it's "wearing" sense is nearly completely dead and we just use "vestir".

Still fun to throw in a "portar" every once in a while and see people struggling to make sense of it XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragzish

True. Serbian also - nositi has both meanings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reconnoisance

Is the same in Catalan Portar =to wear/carry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veganpanda

True, here in the UK "wear" and "carry" are 2 separate words :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itaShadd

Italian as well, though its "wear" sense is a bit uncommon now, except in literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mewsgirl

It makes sense. We do carry our clothing- just not in our hands.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tirlea.ionut

It is the same in Romanian too : a purta = to wear,to carry :)))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/newdoc

Me, too...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OloladeAja

This was me lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/offlimits1702

Why is "meinen Fisch?" and not "mein Fisch? I don't get it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/proxima-centauri

Because it's the direct object of the sentence, it gets put into the accusative case - therefore, 'meinen'. If it were the subject it would be 'mein'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaHillary

My daughter said this to me a couple of years ago. We'd been to a fair, she won a goldfish, and when I told her it was time to leave she said "Fine, you're carrying my fish." I never expected that sentence to come up again. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoisinC1

Well, if Gaga can wear meat, why not fish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chloecoss

Omg I just said that it's so true


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhyemalis

How about, "you bring my fish"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

There is a better translation for "You bring my fish": "Du bringst meinen Fisch," oder "Du bringst meinen Fisch mit." (mitbringen is to carry along. See this entry in the Wikipedia.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erethizo

What if I drop a plate of fish on my wife and I actually want to say "You are wearing my fish!" in German? I am assuming I would say the same and -based on the context- fluent people would get the pun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/diannakiru

After rice washing, seems only normal ... hahahaha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nate896107

You really should wash rice before you cook it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skiphopaj

Rice that isnt "ready to cook" is always washed before hand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidStemm1

My hovercraft is full of eels


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizabethL88

Another crazy sentence I might never say in German, but I like it :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Osubin

Could this also be interpreted as a command to the listener? "YOU carry my fish." Or would a command be: Trägst meinen Fisch? Or am I wrong altogether?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

It could be a command by saying it by using a speacial emphasis. The imperativ would be:

  • "Trag meinen Fisch!" / "Trage meinen Fisch!" (=Carry my fish! to a friend, to one of your parents, to a child) If the imperativ in this form is used with or without "e", is very often a personal desicion, because there is no fix rule.
  • "Tragt meinen Fisch!" (=Carry my fish! to many persons. These persons are your parents, friends, children)
  • "Tragen Sie meinen Fisch!" (=Carry my fish! to one or more people. It is the polite and respectful form which is used to say a command to a teacher, an unknown person, a policeman, ...)

You see, the imperativ form gets another form than a normal statement sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Same way. Although to make clear what you mean, because it's so unexpected, you might be more explicit: "Du trägst als Kleidung meinen Fisch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve34747

And that's why we have both "wear" and "carry" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sturmadler

"you bear my fish" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Valid, but very unusual. Almost archaic.

Still, that would have been something to report as "my answer should be accepted."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sturmadler

The dialect on which I was raised has bits of Cornish and Scotts-Irish diaspora, Pennsylvania Dutch idioms, and a heavy helping of King James. My natural English tendencies are admittedly archaic, but they are often the first words which come to mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve34747

I'm not sure why, but the title "Fish Bearer" is really funny to me. lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam.Sch

is there anyway to know whether the sentence is implying "wear" or "carry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve34747

The only way to know is context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patti410

Um, may someone please tell me the purpose of an umlaut? Im speaking in general when i say this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enishmarati

In German, an umlaut changes the sound of a vowel to give it a more "e"-like sound. Normally, the "a" sound is pronounced like "ah," "o" like "oh," and "u" like "ooh" (roughly). Add an umlaut and ä is pronounced "ae" (sounds closer to the American way of saying the letter). ö and ü are pronounced "oe" and "ue" but American of course does not have similar sounds for me to compare them to, so you'll just have to listen.

The vowels that use them (a, o, and u) can also be written out in a "longhand" way that reflects this. For instance, "trägst" can also be written as "traegst." (I don't know that Duolingo will accept this, but it is correct and Germans do it all the time). When you spell it out like that, it is easier to remember how to pronounce the sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patti410

Thank you so much! I will definitely keep this in mind! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeff.tsuku

Alright, how would you actually say 'Are you are wearing my fish'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve34747

It's the same, but Duo is shaming us for imagining silly but plausible scenarios.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fakeboss

i heard "tragst" as "trinkst"..........but we can't drink fish i think....LOL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

With the Super Bass-o-Matic '76 we sure can:

DanA


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pbandjay

Some of the sentences Duolingo uses as examples...."she is carrying my fish," "I am not a fly".... Oh dear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann390834

Why is it "meinen" ? Is it because "Fisch" is masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Because Fisch is masculine, singular, and Akkusativ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ajhaze

"Hold" doesn't work?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Subtle difference. "Carry" implies movement, but "hold" suggests remaining in one place. Even though you can hold something and perhaps still move, the movement would normally be specified additionally. Compare:

  • Hold the baby while I go into this store.
  • Hold the baby and come with me into the store.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeltaDry

But does "Tragen" also implies movement ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilgehan1993

Just out my curiosity, is there certain way to split two meanings of "tragen"?

For example, how do I say "I carry my shirts" in German in a distinct way without any help of context? Or can I?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve34747

Tragen Sie meinen Fisch! lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrmeda805992

I didnt know this verb also meant carry! It's similar to "llevar" in spanish. Llevas ropa puesta, you "carry" clothes on yourself, or you llevas la bebida a la fiesta, you "carry" the drink to the party. Cool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/starr.fish

Hahaha! It's really incredible. There is a resource I can suggest to see such different uses! https://www.magiclingua.com/learn-german/how-to-say-hello-in-german


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngryGreyCat

I was confused by this. I didn't realize that tragen also meant to carry. I was thinking that they were using wearing as a synonym for "dressing" (the verb not the noun). When you prepare meat, especially game in English you can talk about "dressing" the meat or fish. It just means to prepare if for cooking. I don't know what the word in German is then for dressing meat or fish is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

Dress food: anrichten oder zubereiten
Dress a wound: behandeln
others show at dict.cc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris781422

'Ich trage meine Jacke'. Would you use this for both 'I am carrying my jacket' and 'I am wearing my jacket', or are they generally expressed differently in practice?

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